First Year Abroad

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For over 15 years, FSU’s First Year Abroad (FYA) program has offered students the opportunity to spend their first year of college abroad at one of our four study centers! Spending three semesters abroad allows students to be fully immersed in the culture, history, and customs of another country. With an opportunity to switch locations over the summer semester, this experience is unparalleled in its ability to foster global citizens who have a unique understanding of what it truly means to live abroad. During the program, students can complete experiential learning credits, liberal studies courses, as well as language requirements and first-year prerequisites for most majors. ​



FYA Tuition Waiver & Scholarship

Non-Florida residents who successfully complete the FYA program with a cumulative FYA GPA of 3.0 or higher will qualify for the FYA in-state tuition waiver for the remainder of their first undergraduate degree at FSU. Florida residents who earn at least 14 credits a semester and maintain a cumulative FYA GPA of 3.0 or better receive a $1,500 scholarship toward the program’s next semester- a savings of $3,000 if earned for both the Spring and Summer semesters!​​

Getting Started

  • Step 1: Read the FAQs at the bottom of the First Year/First Semester Home Page.

  • Step 2: Choose your Study Center. Use the garnet tabs below to explore each location, its course offerings, program fee & financial aid details, visa information, and program dates & important documents. Also, check out “Which Study Center is right for me?"

  • Step 3: Apply to your chosen study center location using the garnet pencil under the Description tab! If the application link is not available, check the garnet Dates & Docs tab below to find out when applications will open.

Contact our dedicated Freshmen Programs Team via email (IP-Freshmen@fsu.edu) or phone (850) 644-3272, with any questions or for assistance choosing a location.

Program Description

Florence, Italy

$44,090

CodeTermStart DateEnd DateApply
FY05Spring 202201/13/2204/28/22
FY03Summer 202205/05/2207/30/22Closed
FY04Fall FYA 202209/01/2212/31/22Applications open February 17, 2022.
FY05Spring 202301/01/2304/27/23

Study Center

Founded in 1966, FSU Florence is one of the oldest U.S. study abroad programs in Italy and one of the few located in the historic, medieval heart of this remarkable city. The study center is located in the 16th century Bagnesi Palace on Via de Neri, one of the city’s most famous streets and a paradise for foodies. FSU Florence is only two blocks away from the Ponte Vecchio, the Uffizi Gallery, the Galileo Museum, and one of Europe’s most renowned outdoor spaces, the Piazza della Signoria. The study center features an atrium with coffee bar, glass-ceiling library & courtyard, interior & exterior student lounges, nine classrooms, two computer labs, state-of-the-art textiles and media labs, as well as a Tuscan-style tasting & learning kitchen. On-site security means students, staff, and faculty alike can use the study center as a safe and secure gathering spot for both academic and social activities.

Click here to read more about FSU’s new Florence Study Center and see renderings of the Bagnesi Palace.

Housing

Students studying at FSU Florence are housed in shared Florentine-style apartments within a 20-minute walk of the study center along beautiful cobblestone streets. Each residence includes security, furnished living spaces, a kitchenette and shared kitchen space, washing machines, Wi-Fi, air conditioning, safes, and a weekly cleaning service with a change of bed linens and towels. Students receive meal vouchers that can be redeemed at dozens of local cafes and restaurants throughout Florence. Overnight guests are not allowed in program housing. Please click here for a listing of recommended hotels in Florence.

Program Specific Excursions & Group Activities

Cultural immersion/social events planned for this program may include:

  • Visit to Rome: Colosseum, the Forum, Catacombs, St. Peter’s, the Sistine Chapel, Vatican Museum (2 days)
  • Trip to Venice: private ferry along the Grand Canal, guided visit to St. Mark’s Cathedral, the gold mosaics, monumental gold and jeweled altarpiece, contemporary art experience at the Peggy Guggenheim Museum (2 days)
  • Day excursion to Orvieto: exploring the ancient underground of Orvieto and the disappearing village of Civita’ di Bagno Regio
  • Day trip to Pisa and Lucca: visiting the cathedral complex, posing for photo holding up the leaning tower, visiting city of Lucca with its well-preserved walls and the Guinigi family tower with spectacular view from the top
  • Day trip to medieval Tuscan hill-top towns: Etruscan village of Volterra and famous towers of S. Gimignano
  • Trip to Siena (heart of the Tuscan countryside): visiting the Civic Palace, Cathedral and Opera museums, Piazza del Campo where a centuries old horse race is held every summer
  • Class trips with on-site lessons held in famous museums such as the Uffizi, Accademia (houses the David), Palazzo Vecchio, as well as churches, archaeological sites and historic locations
  • Mayor’s Welcome Day for all U.S. programs held at the Palazzo Vecchio where the Medici family held court
  • Spring art show: students display work publicly
  • Lectures, films, visits to local artisans, wine and food tasting, soccer tournaments with other U.S. universities, student talent show organized for the elderly, FSU participation in annual Run for Life benefiting women’s breast cancer research

* Plans may change due to unexpected events and/or new opportunities.

Program Fees

Include:

  • All registration fees
  • Instructional costs for up to 49 credit hours over 12 months, beginning in the fall term
    • 12 to 17 credit hours for fall/spring
    • 6 to 10 credit hours for 5/6 week summer sessions (up to a total of 16 for the entire summer)
    • 12 to 16 credit hours for full summer session
  • Welcome orientation
  • Housing
  • Fall & Spring: ten meal vouchers per week while school is in session (each worth approximately 5 Euros)
  • Summer sessions: seven meal vouchers per week while school is in session (each worth approximately 5 Euros)
  • Group meals including Welcome Dinner, 'Last Supper', dinner on group trips, Thanksgiving meal (Fall), Carnevale dinner (Spring)
  • Program planned excursions
  • Program planned group activities
  • Full-time academic support
  • Full-time administrative support
  • Entry visa
  • Health Insurance
  • IP T-shirt and travel water bottle
  • IPre-Depart-specific summer orientation for FYA students

Do Not Include:

  • Round-trip international airfare
  • Passport
  • Food (except as noted)
  • Books and supplies
  • Personal travel/activity money
  • Personal spending money
  • University-assessed fees (e.g., per credit hour technology fee)

London, England

$44,090

CodeTermStart DateEnd DateApply
LY05Spring 202201/13/2204/28/22
LY12Summer 202205/06/2208/02/22Closed
LY04Fall FYA 202208/31/2212/31/22Applications open February 17, 2022.
LY05Spring 202301/01/2304/27/23

Study Center

The FSU London Study Centre is housed in a series of historic 17th century townhouses located in the heart of the historic Bloomsbury district – just a block away from the British Museum! Students can visit a variety of historic and cultural sites within walking distance, such as Covent Garden, Trafalgar Square, Piccadilly Circus, and countless other landmarks & events in this capital city. The study center features a library, computer lab, conservatory & student lounge, lecture theatre, classrooms, and administrative offices. Security is our top priority with swipe card access, 24/7 reception, and on-site Program Assistants available to assist students at any time.

Housing

Students studying at FSU London live in shared flats in the center of London. Short walks and easy access to city buses and the London Underground allow students to safely explore this fascinating city. All flats are located either above the study center or in comparable local-area accommodation. Amenities include fully equipped kitchens, furnished living areas, Wi-Fi, cable TV, and a weekly cleaning service with a change of bed linens and towels. Students have 24-hour secure access to FSU London’s library, computer labs, laundry facilities, conservatory & student lounge, classrooms, and administrative offices. Overnight guests are not allowed in program housing. For a list of hotels near the campus, please click here.

Program Specific Excursions & Group Activities

Cultural immersion/social events planned for this program may include:

  • Overnight Excursions

    Edinburgh & St. Andrews, Bruges and Ypres, Bath & Stonehenge, Yorkshire, Cornwall, Liverpool, and North Wales

  • Day Excursions

    Harry Potter Studios, St. Albans, Hampton Court Palace and Windsor, Cambridge, Oxford, Brighton, and Stratford-upon-Avon

  • London Excursions

    Tower of London, Westminster Abbey, Kew Gardens, St. Paul’s Cathedral and Greenwich

  • Class Excursions

    British Museum, National Portrait Gallery, Tate Modern, the Churchill War Rooms and more

  • Other Activities

    • Theatre performances in the West End, Shakespeare’s Globe, the Minack in Cornwall, and Stratford-upon-Avon
    • Guided coach and walking tours of London
    • Boat trips on the River Thames
    • High tea at the National Gallery
    • Opportunity to participate in the Scholar of the Semester program
    • FSU football viewing nights, events for charity, movie nights, pub quizzes, and more

Program Fees

Include:

  • All registration fees
  • Instructional costs for up to 49 credit hours over 12 months, beginning in the fall term
    • 12 to 17 credit hours for fall/spring
    • 9 to 12 credit hours for 12 week summer session
  • Welcome orientation
  • Housing
  • Weekly Breakfast Boxes
  • Monthly group restaurant meals
  • £150 worth of meal vouchers per semester
  • Program-planned half-day and full-day excursions within London and around the UK
  • Program-planned weekend trips within the UK
  • Program planned group activities
  • Full-time academic support
  • London transport pass
  • Scheduled group airport pickup
  • Full-time administrative and pastoral support
  • Health Insurance
  • IP T-shirt
  • IPre-Depart-specific summer orientation for FYA students

Do Not Include:

  • Entry visa fee
  • Round-trip international airfare
  • Passport
  • Food (except as noted)
  • Books and supplies
  • Personal travel/activity/spending money
  • University-assessed fees (e.g., per credit hour technology fee)

Panama City, Republic of Panama

$44,090

CodeTermStart DateEnd DateApply
PY05Spring 202201/03/2204/30/22
PY03Summer 202205/04/2207/30/22Closed
PY04Fall FYA 202208/17/2212/31/22Applications open February 17, 2022.
PY05Spring 202301/01/2305/06/23

Study Center

Situated within the City of Knowledge across from the Panama Canal, FSU Panama offers the amenities of a full campus. With students studying from all over Latin America and the Caribbean at FSU Panama, there is a unique opportunity to meet FSU students from a variety of diverse backgrounds. The City of Knowledge houses various international, non-profit, and government organizations as well as a food court, swimming pool, basketball court, gym, and other amenities available to students. FSU Panama features classrooms, study spaces, science labs, as well as a library and a bookstore. The student lounge & terrace on the top-floor provides views of the Panama Canal and is the perfect place to spend time with friends. Between classes, students can sit and enjoy views of the rainforest and an empanada from the small café. On-site security provides a safe and secure learning environment for all FSU Panama students.

Housing

Students studying at FSU Panama live in a newly constructed, dormitory-style residence within the City of Knowledge complex. Located just a short walk or shuttle ride away from FSU Panama, each room is equipped with air conditioning, Wi-Fi, TV, mini-fridge, study-space, and balcony. On their floor, students have access to a kitchenette with a microwave, coffee maker, and refrigerator. Fingerprint entry grants students access to a fully equipped kitchen, coin-operated laundry room, vending machines, and student lounge on the main floor. A selection of small restaurants and a nearby convenience store makes it easy for students to purchase household items, grab a bite to eat, or enjoy a leisurely meal with other students and City of Knowledge residents. Overnight guests are not allowed in program housing. ​

Program Specific Excursions & Group Activities

Cultural immersion/social events planned for this program may include:

  • Welcome dinner
  • Tour of the Panama Canal Locks and Visitors’ Center
  • Exploration of Colonial Panama, Old Panama, Cosmopolitan Panama
  • Visit to the indigenous communities of the Embera Indians
  • Countryside excursion
  • Visit to a certified agro-touristic farm
  • Visit to the Achiotines tuna fish research laboratory
  • Liquor distillery visit
  • Tour of Taboga and Contadora Islands
  • Turtle hatching expedition
  • Visit to the Colón Free Zone
  • Excursion to the highlands of Panama, including visit to a coffee plantation farm and coffee processing plant
  • Tour of Bocas del Toro
  • Visit to Portobelo and San Lorenzo Fortress
  • Tour of Isla Grande
  • Eco-Canal Tour
  • Farewell dinner

* Plans may change due to unexpected events and/or new opportunities.

Program Fees

Include:

  • All registration fees
  • Instructional costs for up to 49 credit hours over 12 months, beginning in the fall term
    • 12 to 17 credit hours for fall/spring
    • 12 to 16 credit hours for the summer session
  • Welcome orientation
  • Housing
  • Program planned excursions
  • Program planned group activities
  • Full-time academic support
  • Full-time administrative support
  • Entry visa
  • Scheduled group pickup at airport
  • Health Insurance
  • IP T-shirt and travel water bottle
  • IPre-Depart-specific summer orientation for FYA students

Do Not Include:

  • Round-trip international airfare
  • Passport
  • Food (except as noted)
  • Books and supplies
  • Personal travel/activity money
  • Personal spending money
  • University-assessed fees (e.g., per credit hour technology fee)

Valencia, Spain

$44,090

CodeTermStart DateEnd DateApply
VY05Spring 202201/13/2204/28/22
VY03Summer 202205/05/2207/30/22Closed
VY04Fall FYA 202209/01/2212/31/22Applications open February 17, 2022.
VY05Spring 202301/01/2304/27/23

Study Center

Positioned behind the iconic Torres de Serranos, FSU Valencia is located in the heart of Valencia’s historic district. The study center brings history to life with exposed 10th century Moorish walls and glass floors that showcase 14th century leather tanning tanks. Modern comforts, including classrooms, a computer lab, study spaces, and administrative offices blend in seamlessly with the historic learning environment. A beautiful river-bed park is just steps away from the study center, and the futuristic City of Arts and Sciences is within walking distance. 24/7 reception and swipe card access provide safety & security for students.

Housing

Students studying at FSU Valencia are housed in shared apartments in the historic district of the city. Apartments are located either above the study center or in nearby buildings. Amenities include fully-equipped kitchens, lounge space, cable TV, laundry facilities, weekly cleaning service with a change of bed linens and towels, and secure access to the study center’s library, computer lab, and study spaces. Students receive meal vouchers that can be redeemed at restaurants across Spain. Overnight guests are not allowed in program housing. For a list of hotels near the campus, please click here.

Program Specific Excursions & Group Activities

Cultural immersion/social events planned for this program may include:

  • Madrid excursion visiting surrounding locations of Toledo, Segovia, Salamanca or Alcalá de Hernares (3-4 days)
  • Barcelona excursion visiting the Dali Museum and Sagrada Familia (3-4 days)
  • Andalucía excursión, visiting Granada’s Alhambra, Sevilla, Córdoba and flamenco activities. (3-4 days)
  • Pyrenees excursion with rafting activity, medieval castles, mountain activities (3-4 days)
  • Optional day trips every Friday to locations around Valencia: Roman city of Sagunto, Xátiva Castle, wineries of Requena, mountain walks, historical locations, special interactive museum visits
  • Weekly activities including: sports events, exchange conversation meetings, tours, food tasting, group dinners, special events
  • Club de Español weekly events for total immersion in the Spanish language
  • Specific class field trips including: Valencia Court, local archaeology sites, historical landmarks, local markets, theatres, operas, distinctive biospheres
  • Classes integrated in the local Polytechnic University and Universidad Católica with access to state of the art labs
  • Lectures and demonstrations by Spanish professionals in various fields of work

* Plans may change due to unexpected events and/or new opportunities.

Program Fees

Include:

  • All registration fees
  • Instructional costs for up to 49 credit hours over 12 months, beginning in the fall term
    • 12 to 17 credit hours for fall/spring
    • 6 to 10 credit hours for 5/6 week summer sessions (up to a total of 16 for the entire semester)
    • 12 to 16 credit hours for full summer session
  • Welcome orientation
  • Housing
  • Four meal vouchers per week while school is in session (each worth approximately 7 Euros)
  • Breakfast on class days (Fall and Spring)
  • Program planned excursions
  • Program planned group activities
  • Full-time academic support
  • Full-time administrative support
  • Scheduled group pickup at airport
  • Entry visa
  • Health Insurance
  • IP T-shirt and travel water bottle
  • IPre-Depart-specific summer orientation for FYA students

Do Not Include:

  • Round-trip international airfare
  • Passport
  • Food (except as noted)
  • Books and supplies
  • Personal travel/activity money
  • Personal spending money
  • University-assessed fees (e.g., per credit hour technology fee)

Courses

Course offerings are listed below by semester and location. Incoming freshmen considering the First Year or First Semester Abroad programs are encouraged to contact IP-Freshmen@fsu.edu before applying with questions about how course offerings in each location align with your intended major.

Current FSU students abroad can make an appointment to discuss courses with their academic advisor or the International Programs academic advisor via Campus Connect.

Pathway and Summer Admits

Incoming freshmen admitted to FSU for the summer term or through the Seminole Pathways program must enroll in an online course, Global Foundations, offered by International Programs during the Summer C semester prior to going abroad (Late June – Early August). After successful completion of the course (grade of “C” or better), students begin in-person coursework abroad for the fall semester. 

Session PY05Spring 2022
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
ACG2021Introduction to Financial Accounting

This course offers an introduction to financial accounting concepts, placing emphasis on financial statements and how they reflect business transactions. Please note, Accounting Majors must earn at least a "B" in this course to proceed to required 3000 level accounting courses.
3
ACG2071Introduction to Managerial Accounting

This course offers an introduction to managerial accounting concepts. Please note, Accounting majors must earn at least a "B" in this course to proceed to required 3000 level accounting courses.
3
AMH2020A History of the United States Since 1977

This course surveys the United States from the end of the Civil War to the present with emphasis on social, economic, and political problems of the 20th century. May not be taken by students with test credit in American history.
3
BSC1005General Biology for Non-Majors

This course consists of four selected topics in contemporary biology.
3
BSC1005LGeneral Biology for Non-Majors Laboratory

This course may be taken concurrently with lecture or subsequent to completion of lecture with passing grade.
1
BSC2010Biological Science I

This course is the first part of a two-semester introductory biology course designed for those interested in pursuing a career in life sciences. The course provides the building blocks necessary for a student to gain a strong foundation in general biology. Topics covered provide an overview of biological processes and function at the molecular, cellular and organismal level.
3
BSC2010LBiological Science I Laboratory

This course introduces basic chemistry, energetics, metabolism, and cellular organization; molecular genetics and information flow; animal and plant function.
1
BSC2011Biological Science II

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
BSC2011LBiological Science II Laboratory

This course focuses on reproduction and development, transmission (Mendelian) genetics, population biology, ecology, and evolution.
1
CCJ3011Criminology

This course offers an examination of the field of criminology, including its theories, basic assumptions, and definitions.
3
CGS2100Microcomputer Applications for Business/Economics

This course enables students in business and economics to become proficient with microcomputer hardware and software applications that are typically used in the workplace. The following topics are covered: hardware concepts, operating systems, word-processing, spreadsheets, databases, networks, Internet, World Wide Web, multi-media presentations, and information systems. May not be applied toward computer science major or minor. Not open to students with credit in CGS 2060.
3
CGS2518Spreadsheets for Business

This course provides an in-depth study of spreadsheets utilizing a problem-solving approach. Spreadsheet-based solutions are explored for common business tasks and problems. The course presents a thorough coverage of spreadsheet functions and tools, along with a deep understanding of their purpose in a business environment. The course is ideal for students with professional interests related to business and economics, as well as for students wishing to obtain a deeper understanding of spreadsheets in general.
3
CHM1020Chemistry for Liberal Studies (Online)

This course introduces basic chemical principles without an extensive use of mathematics and illustrates with applications in health, energy, and the environment. The course strives to show chemistry as a human endeavor that provides insight into the natural world and informs our decisions as citizens and consumers. Specific topics vary by semester. Designed as a course for students who wish to fulfill the liberal studies science requirement with chemistry and will take no further chemistry courses, not as a preparatory course for CHM 1045. Credit not allowed for CHM 1020 after taking CHM 1032, 1045, or equivalent.
3
CHM1020LChemistry for Liberal Studies Laboratory (Online)

This laboratory emphasizes major topics from CHM 1020 relating chemistry concepts and techniques to everyday life experiences. This laboratory-based course meets two hours a week. No credit allowed after taking CHM 1045.
1
CHM1045General Chemistry I

This course includes topics such as chemical symbols, formulas, and equations; states of matter; reactivity in aqueous solution; electronic structure, bonding, and molecular geometry. Students taking CHM 1045 after taking CHM 1020 and/or CHM 1032 may register for reduced credit, as indicated in the department's policy on reduced credit.
3
CHM1045LGeneral Chemistry I Laboratory

This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include stoichiometry, atomic spectra, gases, as well as acids and bases.
1
CHM1046General Chemistry II

This course includes topics such as intermolecular forces, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, elementary thermodynamics, and electrochemistry.
3
CHM1046LGeneral Chemistry II Laboratory

This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include intermolecular forces, solutions, kinetics, equilibria, acids and bases, buffers, solubility, thermodynamics and electrochemistry.
1
CLP4143Abnormal Psychology

This course focuses on the causes of personality disorganization, diagnosisand treatment of mental illness, and developments in experimental psychopathology.
3
ECO2013Principles of Macroeconomics

This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconomics

This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.
3
ENC1101Freshman Composition and Rhetoric

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
ENC2135Research, Genre, and Context

This course focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts.
3
GEA1000World Geography

This course is a regional survey of the human occupation of the face of the earth, local cultures, political systems, and development problems.
3
GEO1330Environmental Science

This course explores the causes of local and global environmental problems and their impacts, including resource use, pollution, ecosystems, and population growth.
3
GEO2200cPhysical Geography

This course is an overview of earth-sun relations, weather, climate, landforms, water systems, soils, and vegetation.
3
GEO4357Environmental Conflict And Economic Development

This course examines controversies over the use, transformation, and destruction of nature, including political ecology.
3
GLY1030Environmental Issues in Geology

This course examines environmental issues as they relate to geological phenomena, which include volcanic and earthquake hazards, resource and land-use planning, air and water pollution, waste disposal, glaciation and sea-level change, landslides, flooding, shoreline erosion, and global change issues. Course credit may not be received for this course and also GLY 1000 or 2010C. Credit can be received for taking GLY 1000L.
3
IDS2335Central American Cinema

This course gives an overview of Central American Cinema and provides the student with an opportunity to understand and apply basic film analysis tools as well as to understand the socio-political and cultural contexts under which films from six different countries of the region were produced. This course is taught in English.
3
IDS2651Language: Body, Mind, and World

This course provides an examination of language from biological, psychological, and social perspectives, and considers ways that our knowledge of language can be deployed to tackle real-world issues in areas such as health, law, and education.
3
IDS3317Demons, the Antichrist, and Satan

This course examines traditions regarding demons, the Antichrist and Satan in the Bible, Judaism and Christianity. Biblical and ancient non-biblical texts that describe these figures are examined in their historical contexts. Traditions regarding Satan and other evil personages are traced historically so that students have a sense of how an understanding of these figures changed over time.
3
INR2002Introduction to International Relations

This course introduces students to the study of international relations. Major topics include the different actors that participate in international relations and the different goals they pursue, the processes of conflict and cooperation, and recent trends in international politics.
3
INR4083International Conflict

This course examines historical patterns in warfare, and considers the conditions that influence war and peace between nation-states. Topics include causes of war, outcomes and aftermath of war, and approaches to peace.
3
INS3003Introduction to International Affairs

This course introduces students to the core questions and concerns of international affairs. The course surveys the many distinct academic disciplines that together contribute to the development of an interdisciplinary understanding of the international system. The course also examines how each of these disciplines understands the international system, the questions it raises, and its strengths and weaknesses. In addition, the course provides an introduction to many of the global issues of interest to international affairs majors, including terrorism, democracy, and globalization. At the end of this course, students have the skills and knowledge required to construct their own specialized plan of study in international affairs.
3
LAH1093Latin America: A Cross-Cultural History

This course is a cross-cultural history of Latin America focusing on women, Native Americans, African-Americans, mestizos, and mulattoes in historical context. The course does not count as credit toward the history major.
3
LAH3500History of South America

This course is an introductory survey from the Inca Civilization to modern Chile, Peru, Argentina, etc. Emphasis is placed on the contrasts and conflicts between Indian and European culture and on basic social, economic, and political evolution. The persistence of "underdevelopment" and poverty are also explored.
3
LIT2000Introduction to Literature

This course introduces students to key terminology, concepts, and methodologies for the study of complex literature. The course provides a groundwork in literary types for non-majors and is also strongly recommended as preparation for upper-level (3000- or 4000-level) coursework in the field.
3
MAC1105College Algebra

This course is a review of algebraic operations, equations and inequalities; functions and functional notation; graphs; inverse functions; linear, quadratic, rational function; absolute value; radicals; exponential and logarithmic functions; system of equations and inequalities; applications. On the basis of test scores the student may be required to take a community college course before MAC 1105.
3
MAC1114Analytic Trigonometry

This course covers trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs; identities and conditional equations; solution of triangles; trigonometric form of complex numbers; DeMoivre's theorem and nth roots; introduction to plane vectors.
3
MAC1140Pre-Calculus Algebra

This course covers functions and graphs, especially high degree polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; systems of equations; solutions of linear systems; matrix methods; determinants; sequences and series; induction; and the binomial theorem. The course also explores applications, approximation, and methods of proof. May be taken concurrently with MAC 1114.
3
MAC2233Calculus for Business

This course covers limits, continuity, first and higher derivatives, and the differential, with applications to graphing, rates of change, and optimization methods; techniques of integration and applications; introduction to multivariate calculus. Not open to students who have credit in MAC 2311 with a grade of "C-" or better.
3
MAC2311Calculus With Analytic Geometry I

This course covers polynomial, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions; first and second derivatives and their interpretations; definition and interpretation of the integral; differentiation rules; implicit differentiation; applications of the derivative; anti-derivatives; fundamental theorem of calculus. This course must be taken for reduced credit by students with prior credit for some of the content.
4
MAC2312Calculus With Analytic Geometry II

This course covers techniques of integration; applications of integration; series and Taylor series; differential equations. This course must be taken for reduced credit by students with prior credit for some of the content.
4
MAC2313Calculus With Analytic Geometry III

This course covers functions of several variables and their graphical representations; vectors; partial derivatives and gradients; optimization; multiple integration; polar, spherical, and cylindrical coordinate systems; curves; vector fields; line integrals; flux integrals; divergence theorem and Stokes' theorem. This course must be taken for reduced credit by students with prior credit for some of the content.
5
MAN3240Organizational Behavior

This course covers behavioral concepts, techniques, and applications for managing human resources in all types of organizations.
3
MAR3023Basic Marketing Concepts

This course is a required prerequisite for all marketing courses. Gives the student an understanding of the decision areas and the ability to utilize marketing concepts to make business decisions.
3
MGF1106Math for Liberal Studies

This course covers set theory; symbolic logic; counting principles; permutations and combinations; probability; statistics; geometry; applications and history of mathematics. Recommended background: two years of high school algebra. Course is not intended for students whose programs require precalculus or calculus courses.
3
MGF1107Practical Finite Math

This course has a recommended background of two years of high school algebra. Topics include financial mathematics; linear and exponential growth; numbers and number systems; history of mathematics; elementary number theory; voting techniques; graph theory; game theory; geometry; and computer applications.
3
PHI2010Introduction to Philosophy

This course introduces some of the central problems in philosophy. Students also learn how to construct and criticize arguments and develop their own philosophical positions.
3
PHM2300Introduction to Political Philosophy

This course introduces students to the main issues in political philosophy: the justification of political authority, role of law, political obligation, neocolonialism, disobedience, revolution, rights, the appropriate ends of government, patterns of distribution and justice.
3
PHY2048CGeneral Physics A

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of how and why things move. Topics covered include kinematics, forces, energy, momentum, oscillations, and thermodynamics. The course is intended for physical science majors and engineers and to be taken as a sequence with General Physics B (PHY 2049C) and Intermediate Modern Physics (PHY 3101). Completing Modern Physics entitles students to a minor in physics. Calculus is used in this course.
5
PHY2049CGeneral Physics B

This course is an introduction to electricity, magnetism, and optics for physical science majors. Calculus is used. Course consists of lectures, recitations, and laboratory.
5
PSB2000Introduction to Brain and Behavior

This course helps students understand basic nervous system mechanisms that underlie behavior and how systematic observation and experimentation are involved in constructing our understanding of these mechanisms. The course also conveys an appreciation for utilizing critical thinking and scientific knowledge when making important decisions. (Cannot be taken after PSB 3004C.)
3
PSY2012General Psychology

This course is a broad overview covering important psychological principles and findings within the major subfields of psychology, and the basic scientific methods employed. A "bio-psycho-social" approach is emphasized throughout so that all behaviors (including how we think, feel, and act) are discussed in terms of biological, psychological, and social determinants and consequences.
3
QMB3200Quantitative Methods for Business Decisions

This course examines classical and modern decision-making techniques based on probabilistic concepts. Emphasizes applications to all areas of business.
3
REL1300Introduction to World Religions

This course surveys the major living religious traditions of the world, with attention to their origins in the ancient world and their classic beliefs and practices.
3
REL2240Introduction to the New Testament

This course introduces students to the writings of the New Testament in the context of the historical development of early Christianity.
3
SPC1017Fundamentals of Speech

This course provides a survey and application of communication theory, including interpersonal communication, small group communication, and public speaking.
3
SPN1121Elementary Spanish II

This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short texts, poems, and write compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1124, and/or 2220 or be taken by native speakers.
4
SPN2220Intermediate Spanish I

This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short stories, poems, and articles, and write extended compositions and papers in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1121, and/or 1124 or be taken by native speakers.
4
STA2023Fundamental Business Statistics

This course covers statistical applications in business, involving graphical and numerical descriptions of data, data collection, correlation and simple linear regression, elementary probability, random variables, binomial and normal distributions, sampling distributions, and confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for a single sample.
3
SYG2010Social Problems

This course represents a study of various contemporary social problems in an urbanized society, which may include such topics as education, the family, politics, the economy, race relations, drug use and alcoholism, over-population, and other issues.
3
WOH1023The Modern World to 1915

This liberal studies course deals with the origins and development of political, economic, social, and intellectual antecedents of the modern world from the end of the Middle Ages to 1815. Students who have previous college credit in Western civilization courses covering the same general chronological period cannot receive credit for WOH 1023. May not be taken by students with test credit in European history.
3
Session FY05Spring 2022
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
ARH2000Art, Architecture, & Artistic Vision

This course focuses on a thematic approach to the understanding and appreciation of works of art.
3
ARH3150Art & Architecture of Ancient Italy

This course is a survey of Italian art and archaeology including early Italy, the Etruscans, and Rome with reference to the major monuments, works, and archaeological evidence.
3
ARH4312Later Italian Renaissance Art: 16th Century

This course examines works by the great masters of the Renaissance, including Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Titian, against the backdrop of the social and political realities of the day. Discussion includes the rise of the artist-hero, the sources and meaning of Mannerism, and the impact of the religious controversies of the age.
3
CGS2100Microcomputer Applications for Business/Economics (online)

This course enables students in business and economics to become proficient with microcomputer hardware and software applications that are typically used in the workplace. The following topics are covered: hardware concepts, operating systems, word-processing, spreadsheets, databases, networks, Internet, World Wide Web, multi-media presentations, and information systems. May not be applied toward computer science major or minor. Not open to students with credit in CGS 2060.
3
COM4560Social Marketing

This course is an overview and application of social marketing principles and campaigns. The course is designed to familiarize students with current theory and knowledge in the field of social marketing and to provide students experience with planning a social marketing campaign.
3
CTE4707International Topics in Design Industry: Entrepreneurial Families: History and Tradition of Italian Fashion Houses

This course offers an in-depth study of designers and of the design industry in international sites. Students gain a perspective on the influence of fashion on economic, social, artistic, and global culture.
3
CTE4937Fashion and Craftsmanship in Florence

The course focuses on the evolving craftsmanship tradition in Florence, from the artisans of the Renaissance to the makers of the future. Following both a chronological and thematic approach, participants will learn about the tangible and intangible values of the Made in Italy, both in the classroom and on-site. Visits to artisans’ laboratories, galleries, museums, ateliers, and hands-on workshops represent distinguishing features of this experiential learning journey.
3
ECO2000Introduction to Economics (online)

This course is a survey of the discipline for people taking only one economics course. Historical perspective and major principles of theory are presented. Not to be taken by students who have had or who must take ECO 2013 and 2023. Not applicable to the economics major nor the economics minor.
3
ECO2013Principles of Macroeconomics (online)

This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconomics (online)

This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.
3
ENC2135Research, Genre, and Context

This course focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts.
3
ENT1611Designing Your Life with Innovation

This course applies the basic skills of Design Thinking to inspire innovation for students when making life decisions on campus and beyond. Design Thinking employs a three-stage process for developing solutions to the wicked problem of designing your life: Empathize, Ideate, and Build. This course focuses on finding your passion to which you will apply the growth mindset we explored in HUM1921. It is designed to help you figure out who you are, who you want to be, and where you want to go to create a meaningful and fulfilling life. It teaches you to use the Design Thinking process to actively create the life you want based on your interests and values. Using ideas from Designing Your Life: How to Build a Well-Lived, Joyful Life by Bill Burnett and Dave Evans, the course also explores your purpose in college and your major, educational wayfinding, innovating Florida State experiences, and creating your preliminary post-graduation plan. This hands-on class utilizes small group discussions, personal and group reflections, in-class activities, field experiences, and design team collaboration.
1
EUH320519th Century Europe

This course is an introduction to key themes and problems in the social, political, and cultural history of Europe from the era of the French Revolution to the outbreak of World War I. Although this is an upper-level course, no prior background in European history is required.
3
EVR1001Environmental Science

This course is an introduction to environmental science that covers the basic functioning of the earth's environmental system and human effects on that system.
3
EVR1001LEnvironmental Science Lab (Online)

Corequisite: EVR 1001.
1
FOL3930Italian Language Practicum*

This course is for those who have completed through the third semester of Italian language (ITA2220).
3
GEB3213Business Communications

This course is designed to help business students develop the writing, verbal, and interpersonal skills that are necessary for a successful business career.
3
HFT2890International Food and Culture

The course is designed to explore the world’s cuisines with a focus on the history of culinary arts, indigenous ingredients, customs, protocol, celebrations, religions, and various cooking methods and terminology.
3
IDS2411The Italian Mafia: From Corleone to the Globalized World

This course takes a multidisciplinary approach, considering the historical determinants of the mafia as presented by the current literature. A major focus is the identification of the root causes of the mafia and the political, social, historical factors that made possible its genesis and development.
3
IDS3195Vistas on Florence: From Dante to the Big Flood of 1966

This course offers an excursion through eight centuries of Florentine history, engaging students with a variety of sources: primary literary texts, original iconography, visual arts, films, and the direct observation of urban landscape. The city itself, as far as possible, serves as an open-air classroom.
3
ITA1120Elementary Italian I

This introductory course gives the student basic grammatical structures to enable speaking, understanding, reading, and writing at the elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1121 and/or 2220.
4
ITA1121Elementary Italian II

This course builds upon the students ability to speak, understand, read, and write Italian at an elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1120 and/or 2220.
4
ITA2220Readings and Conversation

This course stresses skills in reading and conversational Italian at the second-year level. Readings are supported by discussions of the materials. This course completes the baccalaureate degree requirement. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1120 and/or 1121. May not be taken by native speakers.
3
ITA3420Grammar and Composition*

This course presents a review and further study of grammar and idiomatic constructions. Composition practice augments the skills developed.
3
ITT3500Italian Civilization

This course is an introduction to artistic, intellectual, social, and political trends in Italy from pre-Roman times to the Age of Romanticism with specific reference to Medieval and Renaissance Italy as a center of culture in Europe. Offered in English.
3
LIT3024Perspectives on the Short Story

This course introduces students to the critical reading of short stories dating from the nineteenth through the twenty-first century. This course teaches students to identify tone, narration, form, theme, characterization, and other formal aspects of short fiction. Students are encouraged to formulate their own interpretation of the works read, based on their developing ability to recognize the decisions each author has made in constructing the text.
3
MAC2233Calculus for Business

This course covers limits, continuity, first and higher derivatives, and the differential, with applications to graphing, rates of change, and optimization methods; techniques of integration and applications; introduction to multivariate calculus. Not open to students who have credit in MAC 2311 with a grade of "C-" or better.
3
MGF1107Practical Finite Mathematics

This course has a recommended background of two years of high school algebra. Topics include financial mathematics; linear and exponential growth; numbers and number systems; history of mathematics; elementary number theory; voting techniques; graph theory; game theory; geometry; and computer applications.
3
MMC4302Comparative and International Media Studies

This course is an examination of various international and national media systems and the elements which determine the type of media currently operating throughout the world.
3
PGY2100cPhotography for Non-Art Majors

This course is an introduction to camera operation and image making, with discussion of contemporary and historical work. Emphasis on 35mm slide projects rather than printing techniques. (This course may be offered as part of FSU International Programs curriculum.)
3
PHM2300Introduction to Political Philosophy

This course introduces students to the main issues in political philosophy: the justification of political authority, role of law, political obligation, neocolonialism, disobedience, revolution, rights, the appropriate ends of government, patterns of distribution and justice.
3
POS4235Media and Politics

This course examines the role of the news media, both print and electronic, in shaping public opinion and voter behavior.
3
PSB2000Intro to Brain & Behavior

This course helps students understand basic nervous system mechanisms that underlie behavior and how systematic observation and experimentation are involved in constructing our understanding of these mechanisms. The course also conveys an appreciation for utilizing critical thinking and scientific knowledge when making important decisions. (Cannot be taken after PSB 3004C.)
3
WST3251Women in Western Culture: Images and Realities

This course is an interdisciplinary examination of women's roles in the development of Western culture, focusing on women's contributions to literature, theatre, art, religion, political thought, and science. Concurrently, this course examines what it meant to be female in each era of Western civilization.
3
Session LY05Spring 2022
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
ARH2000Art, Architecture and Artistic Vision

This course focuses on a thematic approach to the understanding and appreciation of works of art.
3
BSC1005General Biology for Non-Majors

This course consists of four selected topics in contemporary biology.
3
BSC1005LGeneral Biology for Non-Majors Laboratory

This course may be taken concurrently with lecture or subsequent to completion of lecture with passing grade.
1
CGS2100Microcomputer Applications for Business/Economics (Online)

This course enables students in business and economics to become proficient with microcomputer hardware and software applications that are typically used in the workplace. The following topics are covered: hardware concepts, operating systems, word-processing, spreadsheets, databases, networks, Internet, World Wide Web, multi-media presentations, and information systems. May not be applied toward computer science major or minor. Not open to students with credit in CGS 2060.
3
CHM1045General Chemistry I

This course includes topics such as chemical symbols, formulas, and equations; states of matter; reactivity in aqueous solution; electronic structure, bonding, and molecular geometry. Students taking CHM 1045 after taking CHM 1020 and/or CHM 1032 may register for reduced credit, as indicated in the department's policy on reduced credit.
3
CHM1045LGeneral Chemistry I Laboratory

This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include stoichiometry, atomic spectra, gases, as well as acids and bases.
1
CHM1046General Chemistry II

This course includes topics such as intermolecular forces, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, elementary thermodynamics, and electrochemistry.
3
CHM1046LGeneral Chemistry II Laboratory

This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include intermolecular forces, solutions, kinetics, equilibria, acids and bases, buffers, solubility, thermodynamics and electrochemistry.
1
CLA2010Peoples of the Roman World

This introductory level course engages with the Roman world from the point of view of the people who lived there. Students study the different kinds of people who inhabited the Roman Empire, focusing on its multiethnic and diverse populaces, and on the ways in which, as in a modern city, rather different groups may have come into contact with one another.
3
COM4930Food & Nutrition in the Media*

This course will teach the principles of effectively communicating food and nutrition science, review current food and health trends and examine the role of media in dispersing nutrition information and misinformation. Field trip experiences planned include supermarkets, restaurants, specialty food shops, media companies, nutrition software developers and a food history focused visit to the Globe Theatre. Students will create an audience specific consumer-focused media project such as videos, blog posts, podcasts, social media posts, or print/digital news reports.
3
CPO3123Comparative Government and Politics: Great Britain

This course examines the political and governmental system of Great Britain within a comparative framework. Comparison and contrast with the United States emphasized.
3
ECO2000Introduction to Economics (online)

This course is a survey of the discipline for people taking only one economics course. Historical perspective and major principles of theory are presented. Not to be taken by students who have had or who must take ECO 2013 and 2023. Not applicable to the economics major nor the economics minor.
3
ECO2013Principles of Macroeconomics (online)

This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconomics (online)

This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.
3
ENC2135Research, Genre, and Context

This course focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts.
3
ENC3416Writing and Editing in Print and Online

This course focuses on the principles of composing, especially across different composing spaces. Students create works in several different media, including (1) in print, (2) on the screen, and (3) for the network, while also learning how to edit the works deployed in each medium appropriately. In addition, students repurpose at least one of these works for another medium. Students conclude the course by creating a digital portfolio.
3
ENL2022British Authors

This course is a survey of English masterworks intended for students in liberal studies and those exploring a literature major. Among the authors typically considered are Wordsworth, Dickens, and Conrad.
3
EUH320620th Century Europe

This course covers European history from the turn of the century through the two world wars. Particular attention is paid to the major powers in this period when Europe declined from its preeminent position.
3
GEB3213Business Communications

This course is designed to help business students develop the writing, verbal, and interpersonal skills that are necessary for a successful business career.
3
HIS4930History of London

This course examines the history of London from its Roman origins through the 20th century. It combines analysis and discussion of a wide variety of primary sources and maps with field work in the form of guided urban walks. Students will learn how to ‘read’ the clues to London’s historical development in the modern cityscape and then apply their understanding and skills in project assignments, such as each exploring and analysing a different neighbourhood of the medieval city. This course examines the history of London from its Roman origins through the 20th century. It combines analysis and discussion of a wide variety of primary sources and maps with field work in the form of guided urban walks. Students will learn how to ‘read’ the clues to London’s historical development in the modern cityscape and then apply their understanding and skills in project assignments, such as each exploring and analysing a different neighbourhood of the medieval city.
3
HUM3123Irish Culture

This course introduces students to the rich traditions and culture of Ireland. The course acquaints students with the cultural factors that have shaped Ireland in general and Dublin in particular.
3
HUM4931British Life & Culture

This course offers students a practical understanding of contemporary Britain in order to enrich their time spent living and studying abroad. It is an interdisciplinary course that fuses history, sociology and media studies to explain the events and trends that have shaped modern Britain and the lives of its varied citizens. It encourages students to draw on their academic knowledge and life experiences of the United States in order to compare British and American life in the modern era - the differences, similarities and cross-influences between the two nations. Ultimately, this course aims to provide the student with a fresh and lasting perspective on contemporary America through a better understanding of the country with which it reputedly has a ‘Special Relationship’.
3
HUN1201Science Of Nutrition

This course focuses on the elements of nutrition and factors influencing the ability of individuals to maintain good nutrition status.
3
HUN3934Food & Nutrition in the Media*

This course will teach the principles of effectively communicating food and nutrition science, review current food and health trends and examine the role of media in dispersing nutrition information and misinformation. Field trip experiences planned include supermarkets, restaurants, specialty food shops, media companies, nutrition software developers and a food history focused visit to the Globe Theatre. Students will create an audience specific consumer-focused media project such as videos, blog posts, podcasts, social media posts, or print/digital news reports.
3
IDS3326Understanding Religion; Understanding People

This course introduces students to the evaluation of some key ethical questions relating, in particular, to religious liberty and toleration, to multiculturalism, to personal spiritual exploration, and ultimately to issues of life and death. The course is specifically designed for students studying at the FSU London Study Centre as it makes extensive use of the city itself as a site of discovery, inspiration and reflection.
3
IDS3435Please Please Me: Anglo-American Youth Culture from the 1950s to the Present

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
INS3003Introduction to International Affairs

This course introduces students to the core questions and concerns of international affairs. The course surveys the many distinct academic disciplines that together contribute to the development of an interdisciplinary understanding of the international system. The course also examines how each of these disciplines understands the international system, the questions it raises, and its strengths and weaknesses. In addition, the course provides an introduction to many of the global issues of interest to international affairs majors, including terrorism, democracy, and globalization. At the end of this course, students have the skills and knowledge required to construct their own specialized plan of study in international affairs.
3
MAC1114Analytic Trigonometry

This course covers trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs; identities and conditional equations; solution of triangles; trigonometric form of complex numbers; DeMoivre's theorem and nth roots; introduction to plane vectors.
3
MAC1140Precalculus Algebra

This course covers functions and graphs, especially high degree polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; systems of equations; solutions of linear systems; matrix methods; determinants; sequences and series; induction; and the binomial theorem. The course also explores applications, approximation, and methods of proof. May be taken concurrently with MAC 1114.
3
MAC2233Calculus for Business

This course covers limits, continuity, first and higher derivatives, and the differential, with applications to graphing, rates of change, and optimization methods; techniques of integration and applications; introduction to multivariate calculus. Not open to students who have credit in MAC 2311 with a grade of "C-" or better.
3
MAC2312Calculus with Analytic Geometry II

This course covers techniques of integration; applications of integration; series and Taylor series; differential equations. This course must be taken for reduced credit by students with prior credit for some of the content.
4
PGY2100cPhotography for Non-Art Majors

This course is an introduction to camera operation and image making, with discussion of contemporary and historical work. Emphasis on 35mm slide projects rather than printing techniques. (This course may be offered as part of FSU International Programs curriculum.)
3
PHM2121Philosophy of Race, Class, and Gender

In this course students study selected contemporary philosophical, literary, and journalistic discussions of questions regarding race, class, and gender with a particular emphasis on the status of these discussions in the United States. Students also survey theoretical accounts of the concepts of race, class, and gender, as well as their interrelatedness, and examine their application to various contemporary social issues.
3
REL3170Religious Ethics and Moral Problems

This course discusses contemporary moral problems such as deception, sexual activities and relations, and capital punishment from the standpoints of major religious traditions.
3
SPC2608Public Speaking

This course covers the principles of and the practical experience of public speaking. The course is required of all majors. The course is also available in hybrid format (mostly online, partly classroom).
3
STA2122Introduction to Applied Statistics

This course covers normal distributions, sampling variation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, one-way and two-way analysis of variance, correlation, simple and multiple regression, contingency tables and chi-square tests, non-parametric statistics. No credit given for STA 2122 if a grade of "C-" or better is earned in STA 2171, STA 3032 or QMB 3200.
3
THE2000Introduction to Theatre

This course focuses on the historical development and basic elements for appreciation and evaluation of theatrical performances. The course is designed for non-majors.
3
Session VY05Spring 2022
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
BSC1005General Biology For Non-Majors

This course consists of four selected topics in contemporary biology.
3
BSC1005LGeneral Biology Lab

This course may be taken concurrently with lecture or subsequent to completion of lecture with passing grade.
3
BSC2010Biological Science I

This course is the first part of a two-semester introductory biology course designed for those interested in pursuing a career in life sciences. The course provides the building blocks necessary for a student to gain a strong foundation in general biology. Topics covered provide an overview of biological processes and function at the molecular, cellular and organismal level.
3
BSC2010LBiological Science I Laboratory

This course introduces basic chemistry, energetics, metabolism, and cellular organization; molecular genetics and information flow; animal and plant function.
1
CGS2100Microcomputer Applications for Business/Economics

This course enables students in business and economics to become proficient with microcomputer hardware and software applications that are typically used in the workplace. The following topics are covered: hardware concepts, operating systems, word-processing, spreadsheets, databases, networks, Internet, World Wide Web, multi-media presentations, and information systems. May not be applied toward computer science major or minor. Not open to students with credit in CGS 2060.
3
CHM1045General Chemistry I

This course includes topics such as chemical symbols, formulas, and equations; states of matter; reactivity in aqueous solution; electronic structure, bonding, and molecular geometry. Students taking CHM 1045 after taking CHM 1020 and/or CHM 1032 may register for reduced credit, as indicated in the department's policy on reduced credit.
3
CHM1045LGeneral Chemistry I Laboratory

This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include stoichiometry, atomic spectra, gases, as well as acids and bases.
1
CHM1046General Chemistry II

This course includes topics such as intermolecular forces, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, elementary thermodynamics, and electrochemistry.
3
CHM1046LGeneral Chemistry II Laboratory

This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include intermolecular forces, solutions, kinetics, equilibria, acids and bases, buffers, solubility, thermodynamics and electrochemistry.
1
ECO2000Introduction to Economics (online)

This course is a survey of the discipline for people taking only one economics course. Historical perspective and major principles of theory are presented. Not to be taken by students who have had or who must take ECO 2013 and 2023. Not applicable to the economics major nor the economics minor.
3
ECO2013Principles of Macroeconomics (online)

This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconomics (online)

This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.
3
ENC2135Research, Genre, and Context

This course focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts.
3
EUH2000Ancient & Medieval Civilizations

This course provides a survey of Western traditions from the beginnings through the end of the Middle Ages. Emphasis is on patterns of thinking and on those institutions most distinctive for the Western tradition. Students who have previous college credit in Western civilization courses covering the same general chronological period cannot receive credit for EUH 2000. May not be taken by students with test credit in European history.
3
FIL2001Introduction to Cinema Studies: Analysis & Practice

This course introduces students to film analysis theories and techniques, including the basics of dramatic structure, genre, prevalent filmmaking theories, and film production processes. Through weekly film screenings, class discussion, and hands-on production exercises, students develop and practice skills to help them compare and interpret films representing a variety of genres, aesthetic traditions, and cultural contexts.
3
GEB3213Business Communications

This course is designed to help business students develop the writing, verbal, and interpersonal skills that are necessary for a successful business career.
3
HUM2250Humanities: 19th-Century Romanticism to Postmodernism

This course offers an introduction to the thought, literature, and arts of Western culture from the 18th-century Romanticism to the Postmodern period.
3
HUM3930Special Topics: Spanish Culture & Civilization

Spain is a complex and vivacious country with a rich and hybrid cultural background. In this course, we will study the history, culture and society of the different people who have contributed to the formation of the current European nation from its origin to the present. The students will learn about Spain not only through readings and lectures, but also, and most importantly, through real life experiences, such as excursions and visits to the actual historical sites, monuments, museums, churches and other places of interest. We will also study the fundamental importance of Spanish food culture as a socio-cultural element worthy of serious analysis. This course will also make use of select films to enhance our analysis of Spanish culture. This course counts as a Core Course for the Iberian Studies minor.
3
HUN2125Food & Society

This course examines the impact of society on human food ways, role of food and nutrition in national development and global politics. For nonmajors.
3
IDS2370Festivals: Artisanship, Satire, and Fire

In Western Humanity there is a long standing tradition of celebrations and festivals that manifest our roots as human beings. The author Anthony Burgess once stated that, “It’s always good to remember where you come from and celebrate it. To remember where you come from is part of where you are going.” Since pre-history, some celebrations stem from pagan origins, while others derived from organized religion backgrounds. This course will be a general Trans-Atlantic view of some celebrations and festivals that currently shape society, and individuals in the modern Western World. We will closely examine them from their historical roots, and how they have developed into international tourist attractions. Particular focus will emphasize how these events impact us a society locally, regionally, and globally. We will explore Autumn Festivals such as Oktoberfest, and those celebrations that mark the beginning of warm weather such as carnival in Venice and Rio de Janeiro. As we are in a unique area of Western Europe, attention will be given to Spain, yet with special emphasis on festivities in the city of Valencia. For example, the world famous Fallas festival, the “Tomatina festival in Buñol, or the running and swimming with the bulls in the town of Denia. Moreover , as The United States is a country with various cultural groups, we will study and analyze such celebrations in our country as: The Day of The Dead, Running of The Bulls, Quinceañeras, Mardi Gras Carnival, etc. In the final analysis, celebrations and festivities are some of the basic common links that we have while inhabiting this small planet, and a manifestation of global diversity and society.
3
IDS2674Animation and Identity

This course examines the medium of animation and the contributions of influential animators with a focus on how identity and societal milieu influence artistic expression in animation. Through animation screenings, discussion, and hands-on animation exercises, students are exposed to diverse animation styles and approaches, create original short animations, and come to better understand the creative process utilized in animation.
3
LIT3383Women in Literature

In this course, students study texts that consider women's roles in society. The course focuses on women's gender roles and legal status during the Victorian period. What kinds of political and literary power did women have? What did women have to say about social and political matters? How did women use literary forms to communicate their arguments?
3
MAC1114Analytic Trigonometry

This course covers trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs; identities and conditional equations; solution of triangles; trigonometric form of complex numbers; DeMoivre's theorem and nth roots; introduction to plane vectors.
3
MAC1140Pre-Calculus Algebra

This course covers functions and graphs, especially high degree polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; systems of equations; solutions of linear systems; matrix methods; determinants; sequences and series; induction; and the binomial theorem. The course also explores applications, approximation, and methods of proof. May be taken concurrently with MAC 1114.
3
MAC2233Calculus for Business

This course covers limits, continuity, first and higher derivatives, and the differential, with applications to graphing, rates of change, and optimization methods; techniques of integration and applications; introduction to multivariate calculus. Not open to students who have credit in MAC 2311 with a grade of "C-" or better.
3
MAN3240Organizational Behavior

This course covers behavioral concepts, techniques, and applications for managing human resources in all types of organizations.
3
MAN3600Multinational Business Operations

This course provides an overview of the environments, markets, institutions, challenges, strategies, and operations of international and cross-cultural business; the globalization of business and associated challenges posed for the competitiveness of the modern enterprise; and the orientations, strategies, and tactics appropriate for international business success.
3
MAR3023Basic Marketing Concepts

This course is a required prerequisite for all marketing courses. Gives the student an understanding of the decision areas and the ability to utilize marketing concepts to make business decisions.
3
MGF1106Math for Liberal Arts I

This course covers set theory; symbolic logic; counting principles; permutations and combinations; probability; statistics; geometry; applications and history of mathematics. Recommended background: two years of high school algebra. Course is not intended for students whose programs require precalculus or calculus courses.
3
MUL2010Music Literature, Listening, and Understanding

This course is an introduction to music as a manifestation of human culture, as an expressive art form, and as an intellectual discipline. The course also develops a knowledge of a variety of significant musical repertoire, skills for perceptive listening, and the ability to respond to musical expression with critical insight.
3
SPN1120Elementary Spanish I

This course is the first of a three-semester sequence of courses for students with no prior knowledge of the Spanish language, either at the high-school or native-speaker level. The course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short texts and write paragraphs and short compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1121, 1124, and/or 2220. May not be taken by native speakers. Some sections may be computer-assisted.
4
SPN1121Elementary Spanish II

This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short texts, poems, and write compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1124, and/or 2220 or be taken by native speakers.
4
SPN2220Intermediate Spanish I

This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short stories, poems, and articles, and write extended compositions and papers in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1121, and/or 1124 or be taken by native speakers.
4
SPN2240Intermediate Spanish II

This course completes the intermediate Spanish skills sequence and finishes the review of the grammar sequence begun in SPN 2220. Students deepen their functional skills in comprehending, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish, and gain an overview of Hispanic culture in various countries. Not open to native or heritage speakers of Spanish.
3
SPN3300Spanish Grammar and Composition

This course covers the theory and practice of Spanish grammar and its applications to compositions. Can be taken concurrently with SPN 3400.
3
SPN3400Spanish Reading and Conversation

This course develops communicative proficiency and accuracy in both reading and writing Spanish. Can be taken concurrently with SPN 3300. Not open to native or heritage speakers of Spanish.
3
SPN4444Business Writing in Spanish

This course covers letter writing, business terminology, as well as conducting business in the Hispanic world.
3
SPT3391Hispanic Cinema

This course is a study of the films, movements and directors of Hispanic cinema. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours. Taught in English.
3
SPW3104Readings from Iberia

This course provides students, through a variety of readings and written and oral activities, with a fundamental knowledge of the critical issues related to modern Spain from 1700 to the present.
3
STA2023Fundamental Business Statistics

This course covers statistical applications in business, involving graphical and numerical descriptions of data, data collection, correlation and simple linear regression, elementary probability, random variables, binomial and normal distributions, sampling distributions, and confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for a single sample.
3
Session VY03: Summer 2022
Students must choose at least two classes from VA01 and two classes from VA02
Session VA01Summer 2022
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
CHM1082Kitchen Chemistry

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of chemical science by using a wealth of examples from everyday experiences in the kitchen. Chemical reactions are discussed as relevant to the food preparation and food ageing processes. The concepts of atoms and molecules, temperature and pressure, acids and bases, solutions and concentrations are covered using the familiar everyday environment. The students will learn to recognize the molecular-level intricacies involved in the processes of baking, grilling, toasting, and brewing.
3
GEB3213Business Communications

This course is designed to help business students develop the writing, verbal, and interpersonal skills that are necessary for a successful business career.
3
HFT2890International Food and Culture

The course is designed to explore the world’s cuisines with a focus on the history of culinary arts, indigenous ingredients, customs, protocol, celebrations, religions, and various cooking methods and terminology.
3
HUM2020Examining the Human Condition Through Literature, Art, and Film

In this course, students gain an overview of the development of Western culture from Antiquity to the present as it is expressed through the arts (painting, sculpture, architecture, literature, music, film and the performing arts), and especially through literature. The course examines the human condition through culture and the arts to better understand how the humanities are interconnected.
3
HUM3321Multicultural Dimensions of Film and 20th-Century Culture

This course examines the impact of American Cinema on social relations and on the reproduction of power. Students benefit from this course by learning a matrix of movie history, movie genres, and approaches to multiculturalism by which to judge movies, cultural representation and the cultural experiences of life. The movies provide a window into middle and late 20th century cultures, which serve as comparisons and contrasts for culture in the 21st century.
3
HUM3930Spanish Culture & Civilization

Spain is a complex and vivacious country with a rich and hybrid cultural background. In this course, we will study the history, culture and society of the different people who have contributed to the formation of the current European nation from its origin to the present. The students will learn about Spain not only through readings and lectures, but also, and most importantly, through real life experiences, such as excursions and visits to the actual historical sites, monuments, museums, churches and other places of interest. We will also study the fundamental importance of Spanish food culture as a socio-cultural element worthy of serious analysis. This course will also make use of select films to enhance our analysis of Spanish culture. This course counts as a Core Course for the Iberian Studies minor.
3
HUN1201The Science of Nutrition

This course focuses on the elements of nutrition and factors influencing the ability of individuals to maintain good nutrition status.
3
IDS2381From Pottery to Forgery

This course introduces students to chemistry by exploring the fundamental chemical concepts and phenomena that underlie the emergence and appearance of various forms of art. The students will learn to appreciate the atomic nature of matter, the formation of bonds between atoms to make up chemical compounds, and the emergence of particular properties reflected in the artwork and in our perception of art forms. The evolution of materials and art forms will be discussed as connected to the progress in scientific discovery and the evolutions of knowledge.
3
IDS3179Ethics Through Art

This course is a philosophical investigation into the relationship between ethics and art, focusing on the following questions: Can art contain ethical content, in a way that uniquely furthers the philosophical investigation of ethics? Can some works of art help us develop ethical awareness? Does all art by its nature have ethical content, or can art be amoral?
3
LDR2101Leadership Theory and Practice

This course is designed to inspire, teach, and engage students in the process of learning leadership. The course introduces students to leadership theory and helps them understand their unique role in leadership on campus, in their academic discipline, and within our larger society.
3
LDR3215Leadership and Change

This advanced undergraduate leadership course examines the change process and prepares leaders who are effective in working with individuals, groups, and organizations in leading and managing change. This is an interactive theory-to-practice course, focused on leadership as a change process.
3
MAC2311Calculus with Analytic Geometry I

This course covers polynomial, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions; first and second derivatives and their interpretations; definition and interpretation of the integral; differentiation rules; implicit differentiation; applications of the derivative; anti-derivatives; fundamental theorem of calculus. This course must be taken for reduced credit by students with prior credit for some of the content.
4
MAN3240Organizational Behavior

This course covers behavioral concepts, techniques, and applications for managing human resources in all types of organizations.
3
MAN3600Multinational Business Operations

This course provides an overview of the environments, markets, institutions, challenges, strategies, and operations of international and cross-cultural business; the globalization of business and associated challenges posed for the competitiveness of the modern enterprise; and the orientations, strategies, and tactics appropriate for international business success.
3
MAR3023Basic Marketing Concepts

This course is a required prerequisite for all marketing courses. Gives the student an understanding of the decision areas and the ability to utilize marketing concepts to make business decisions.
3
PGY2100cPhoto for Non-Art Majors

This course is an introduction to camera operation and image making, with discussion of contemporary and historical work. Emphasis on 35mm slide projects rather than printing techniques. (This course may be offered as part of FSU International Programs curriculum.)
3
PHI2635Bioethics

This course is an examination of the philosophical foundations of bioethical theory and an exploration of the trenchant issues in contemporary bioethics with a concentration on discussions of race, gender, and vulnerable populations (e.g. the poor, immigrants). The course employs tools of ethical theory, philosophical analysis, and analytic writing to examine a number of moral issues arising in health care including justice in health care, experimentation and research on human subjects, reproductive technology, aging, organ donation, and euthanasia. Throughout the course we examine assumptions about rights, persons, and ethical principles at work in medical decisions.
3
SPN1120Elementary Spanish I

This course is the first of a three-semester sequence of courses for students with no prior knowledge of the Spanish language, either at the high-school or native-speaker level. The course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short texts and write paragraphs and short compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1121, 1124, and/or 2220. May not be taken by native speakers. Some sections may be computer-assisted.
4
SPN1121Elementary Spanish II

This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short texts, poems, and write compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1124, and/or 2220 or be taken by native speakers.
4
SPN2220Intermediate Spanish

This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short stories, poems, and articles, and write extended compositions and papers in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1121, and/or 1124 or be taken by native speakers.
4
SPN2240Intermediate Spanish II

This course completes the intermediate Spanish skills sequence and finishes the review of the grammar sequence begun in SPN 2220. Students deepen their functional skills in comprehending, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish, and gain an overview of Hispanic culture in various countries. Not open to native or heritage speakers of Spanish.
3
SPN3300Spanish Grammar and Composition

This course covers the theory and practice of Spanish grammar and its applications to compositions. Can be taken concurrently with SPN 3400.
3
SPN3400Spanish Reading and Conversation

This course develops communicative proficiency and accuracy in both reading and writing Spanish. Can be taken concurrently with SPN 3300. Not open to native or heritage speakers of Spanish.
3
SPT3391Hispanic Cinema

This course is a study of the films, movements and directors of Hispanic cinema. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours. Taught in English.
3
SPW3104Readings from Iberia

This course provides students, through a variety of readings and written and oral activities, with a fundamental knowledge of the critical issues related to modern Spain from 1700 to the present.
3
Session VA02Summer 2022
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
ANT2100Introduction to Archaeology

This course is an introduction to modern anthropological archaeology. The course introduces students to the interdisciplinary scientific approaches employed in contemporary archaeological research and provides students with an overview of the origins and evolution of human social and economic systems.
3
ARH2000Art, Architecture, and Artistic Vision

This course focuses on a thematic approach to the understanding and appreciation of works of art.
3
ARH3930Special Topics: Art and Mimesis: From Zeuxis to A.I.

This course uses devotional sculpture from Golden-Age Spain as a jumping-off point to explore the paradoxes and creative possibilities of art that imitates life. From the FSU Valencia Center, through museum tours and visits to the biomorphic architecture of the City of Arts and Sciences, students will engage the entangled history of art and mimesis. Lectures will cover case studies ranging from ancient death masks, to the uncanny effigies of the Fallas Festival; and from the Greek painter Zeuxis, who fooled birds with his trompe l’oeil painting of grapes, to Wangechi Mutu’s mimetic Blackness recasting the script for Black life.
3
ENT3607Innovation by Design

This course teaches methods common to human-centered innovation frameworks such as Design Thinking: empathizing, framing and reframing problems, ideating, prototyping and testing solutions. Students learn the process of developing products, services, systems and other solutions from the initial discovery of needs, to presenting a tested solution ready for deployment.
3
ENT4934European Medical Innovation and Entrepreneurship

This course explores emerging innovation in Spanish biotech companies, uncovers which innovations are at the inflection point of success, and investigates how they are gaining traction in the European and global marketplace. The innovations explored come from advances in biology, engineering, computer science, and medicine, spanning biological molecules to medical devices to even healthcare delivery systems. Background in these areas is not required. There are no pre-requisites.
3
EUH2000Ancient and Medieval Civilizations

This course provides a survey of Western traditions from the beginnings through the end of the Middle Ages. Emphasis is on patterns of thinking and on those institutions most distinctive for the Western tradition. Students who have previous college credit in Western civilization courses covering the same general chronological period cannot receive credit for EUH 2000. May not be taken by students with test credit in European history.
3
EUH3930Studies in European History: The Spanish Civil War

In 1936 a group of generals rose up against Spain’s democratically-elected republican government and launched the Spanish Civil War. After nearly three years of devastating conflict, the rebels were victorious, and General Franco established a brutal dictatorship which lasted until 1975. In this class we will examine the causes of the Civil War and the experience of the war from the perspectives of those involved. How did Franco consolidate his power after the Civil War, and why did his regime last so long? What happened to those who had supported the losing side? Finally, we will explore Spain’s transition to democracy when Franco died. How was a modern democratic system established so smoothly? We will use a range of sources from the period of the Civil War and Dictatorship including images, music and film. Valencia was the base of the Republic government during the Civil War, and we will make use of local resources and historical sites in the class.
3
FIL2030History of Motion Pictures

This course is an overview of international film as an industry, mass medium, and art form.
3
GEB3213Business Communication

This course is designed to help business students develop the writing, verbal, and interpersonal skills that are necessary for a successful business career.
3
HUM3930Spanish Culture & Civilization

Spain is a complex and vivacious country with a rich and hybrid cultural background. In this course, we will study the history, culture and society of the different people who have contributed to the formation of the current European nation from its origin to the present. The students will learn about Spain not only through readings and lectures, but also, and most importantly, through real life experiences, such as excursions and visits to the actual historical sites, monuments, museums, churches and other places of interest. We will also study the fundamental importance of Spanish food culture as a socio-cultural element worthy of serious analysis. This course will also make use of select films to enhance our analysis of Spanish culture. This course counts as a Core Course for the Iberian Studies minor.
3
HUN2125Food and Society

This course examines the impact of society on human food ways, role of food and nutrition in national development and global politics. For nonmajors.
3
IDS2144Information Ethics for the 21st Century

This course identifies past, present and future information ethics challenges and encourages students to develop their own standpoints from which to address them. The primary purpose of this course is to provide students with the knowledge, skills and attitudes required to make informed ethical decisions about information production, management and use. Students explore and apply a wide range of ethical theories to examine critical information ethics issues raised by recent advances in information and communication technology.
3
IDS2453Reality and Illusion in World Cinema

This course examines world cinema with a focus on the elusive and continually shifting boundary between reality and illusion. The course investigates creative approaches to storytelling and the craft of filmmaking not typically seen in traditional Hollywood or American independent film productions.
3
LIS2527Digital Storytelling in Information Environments

This course helps students build their presentation skills through an understanding of the role of storytelling in the context of information environments such as the family, library, school, business, and social media. Students will learn how to use stories to understand these environments better and to communicate, teach, learn, lead, and advocate when operating within them. Students will learn traditional stories, write original stories, and present stories in class exercises and assignments. Students will also learn to critique story presentations and to provide constructive feedback to other developing storytellers.
3
MAN3240Organizational Behavior

This course covers behavioral concepts, techniques, and applications for managing human resources in all types of organizations.
3
MAN4930Special Studies in Business: Diversity and Inclusion in the Workplace

This course will provide a foundation for understanding diversity in the workplace and how to manage diversity effectively in organizations. As the world of business has become more globalized and diverse, the need to manage diversity effectively is increasingly essential for organizational success. The course examines various forms of diversity in the workplace (e.g., culture, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, age, disability, sexual orientation) and is designed to prepare individuals to meet the challenge of diversity management through experiential exercises and applied projects. We will visit different organizations in order to understand diversity and inclusion practices in Spain and from a cross-cultural perspective. Students will compare and contrast diversity and inclusion practices in the US/ North America and Spain/Europe. By integrating content and experiences from North American and European organizations, students will walk away with knowledge of interventions, initiatives, and actions that organizations can implement to improve diversity and inclusion efforts across different cultures.
3
MAR3023Basic Marketing Concepts

This course is a required prerequisite for all marketing courses. Gives the student an understanding of the decision areas and the ability to utilize marketing concepts to make business decisions.
3
MAR3323Promotional Management

This course focuses on issues related to management of promotional tools including advertising, personal selling, sales promotion, public relations, and publicity.
3
REL1300Introduction to World Religions

This course surveys the major living religious traditions of the world, with attention to their origins in the ancient world and their classic beliefs and practices.
3
REL3936Special Topics in Religion: Introduction to Islam in Spain

This course offers an overview of the history and development of Islam in the Iberian peninsula, focusing particularly on the city of Valencia. The course will examine the built and lived environment of the city – its architecture, foodways, art and customs – as a means of exploring the presence, both past and present, of Muslims in Spain. The course welcomes students with no experience in religious studies or Islamic studies, and invites them to consider how the actions, choices and experiences of human beings from a different era give us a more powerful understanding of our own.
3
SPN1120Elementary Spanish I

This course is the first of a three-semester sequence of courses for students with no prior knowledge of the Spanish language, either at the high-school or native-speaker level. The course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short texts and write paragraphs and short compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1121, 1124, and/or 2220. May not be taken by native speakers. Some sections may be computer-assisted.
4
SPN1121Elementary Spanish II

This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short texts, poems, and write compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1124, and/or 2220 or be taken by native speakers.
4
SPN2220Intermediate Spanish

This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short stories, poems, and articles, and write extended compositions and papers in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1121, and/or 1124 or be taken by native speakers.
4
SPN2240Intermediate Spanish II

This course completes the intermediate Spanish skills sequence and finishes the review of the grammar sequence begun in SPN 2220. Students deepen their functional skills in comprehending, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish, and gain an overview of Hispanic culture in various countries. Not open to native or heritage speakers of Spanish.
3
SPN2340Basic Spanish for Bilingual/Heritage Speakers

This is the first course of a two-course sequence intended for bilingual and heritage Spanish speakers. This intermediate course provides bilingual and heritage Spanish speakers with opportunities to study and analyze spoken, oral, and written Spanish in an academic setting.
3
SPN3300Spanish Grammar and Composition

This course covers the theory and practice of Spanish grammar and its applications to compositions. Can be taken concurrently with SPN 3400.
3
SPN3400Spanish Reading and Conversation

This course develops communicative proficiency and accuracy in both reading and writing Spanish. Can be taken concurrently with SPN 3300. Not open to native or heritage speakers of Spanish.
3
SPN4930Studies in Hispanic Language: Multilingual Spain

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
SPT3391Hispanic Cinema

This course is a study of the films, movements and directors of Hispanic cinema. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours. Taught in English.
3
STA2122Introduction to Applied Statistics

This course covers normal distributions, sampling variation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, one-way and two-way analysis of variance, correlation, simple and multiple regression, contingency tables and chi-square tests, non-parametric statistics. No credit given for STA 2122 if a grade of "C-" or better is earned in STA 2171, STA 3032 or QMB 3200.
3
URP3000Introduction to Planning and Urban Development

This course introduces planning concepts and the role of planning in formulating policy, meeting critical problems, and shaping the future urban environment.
3
URS1006World Cities: Quality of Life

In this course, major world cities are examined in terms of their natural, social, and built environments in order to assess those factors that promote quality-of-life and sustainability. Prospects for future growth and change are considered in light of demographic, cultural, economic, and political trends.
3
Session FY03: Summer 2022
Students must choose at least two classes from FL01 and at least two classes from FL02
Session FL01Summer 2022
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
ARH2000Art, Architecture & Artistic Vision

This course focuses on a thematic approach to the understanding and appreciation of works of art.
3
ARH4933Florentine Renaissance

The course is set against the historical background of Florence and looks at art and architecture in the context of patronage; that of the church, the guilds, the merchants and the Medici, the ruling family of the city. The Renaissance produced outstanding artists such as Donatello, Botticelli, Verrocchio, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo and Raphael; but these artists could not have existed without their patrons. It is this inter-connection which is our theme. The course will examine the emergence of Renaissance Florence via site visits to churches, palaces, museums and classroom sessions. The story is an unprecedented and excititng one: one small city produced a staggering array of artistic talent in a short period of time. Classical antiquity was the model, not only in artistic terms but in philosophical and political ones as well: Florence saw the rebirth of classical antiquity. The impact of that rebirth, that renaissance, still affects us today: our ways of thought, our ways of seeing are conditioned by that momentous period which changed the past forever, and ushered in the first modern era.
3
ART2003CContemporary Art Scholarship and Practice

This course provides an introduction to the theories and creative processes that propel contemporary art and design. The course studies a wide range of media and methods used by visual artists and designers to create meaning in their images, objects, and experiences. Offered to all non-art majors.
3
ENT2802Entrepreneurship in Contemporary Society

This course explores entrepreneurship in society by understanding how innovation can led to commerce and how commerce impacts our daily lives. Topics include the process of innovation, the nature of entrepreneurialism, the essence of Problem-Opportunity-Venture-Operations (POVO) model, the lean star-up business model, different kinds of entrepreneurship (commercial, social, scientific and artistic) and an introduction to competencies that have facilitated success in other entrepreneurs.
3
ENT3273Family Business

This course covers special issues facing entrepreneurial and family businesses: choice of organizational form, business planning, tax and compensation planning, business valuation, and succession strategies. Time is also devoted to the unique challenges often found in family business context, such as dealing with family conflicts, how to motivate and evaluate employees when a mix of family and non-members are involved, and planning for succession.
3
FOL3930Experiments in Modern Languages*

This course is for those who have completed through the third semester of Italian language (ITA2220).
3
GEB3213Business Communications

This course is designed to help business students develop the writing, verbal, and interpersonal skills that are necessary for a successful business career.
3
IDS2129When Culture and Business Collide: Communication in an International Context

In this course, students engage in critical and creative thinking about contemporary problems and solutions in intercultural business communication. Students also grapple with these issues in both an international and domestic context.
3
IDS2661Made in Italy

The ability to answer life’s challenges with an incomparable mix of practicality and beauty seems to be a trademark of Italian culture. From Roman times to the contemporary period, Italian creativity has influenced the world in the most various fields of knowledge and practice, both in the sciences and humanities. We can think of Roman law and buildings; Dante’s Divine Comedy; Leonardo da Vinci’s genius; Michelangelo’s art; Machiavelli’s ideas; Monteverdi’s creation of Opera; Fellini’s masterpieces; Italian cars, cuisine, fashion, and even the recent Maneskin musical phenomenon! Each philosophy, discovery, invention and product is, however, rife with ethical issues and questions due to the complex nature of the human relationships involved in its creation and fruition.Through the Made in Italy concept, this course has the twofold objective of introducing students to Italian culture and to ethical thinking. Using a variety of case studies, we will explore ethical concerns and positions specific to our era of globalization. Should we, for example, celebrate Columbus’ Day? How do we reconcile our fashion addiction with concerns about skilled labor’s exploitation? What ethical issues are hiding behind the Made in Italy label?
3
IDS3330The Culture is in the Cuisine-The Food of Italy

Italy’s great variety of gastronomic traditions makes the country’s culinary heritage extraordinarily rich and unique. This course will explore the cultural history of Italian cuisine from the medieval period to contemporary times. We will examine how culinary practices and the culture of food are essential elements of “Italian” identity. Students will experience the historical evolution of food and discover how gastronomy is interwoven into all aspects of Italian social life and culture. Through a mixture of first-hand experience in and around Florence and Tuscany (excursions to local food markets, such as the San Lorenzo Market, and to wine and cheese producers) and interpretative analysis (study of classic food texts, written assignments, and class discussion), students’ epicurean travels will include regional explorations into cuisine, the craftsman-like nature of food and wine, and the ethic of food and consumerism as depicted in the Slow Food Revolution.
3
IND2219Design and the Human Experience

Course is approved for Liberal Studies and meets the Humanities and Cultural Practice FSU requirement. This course focuses on the impact of design on the human experience. It is a gateway experience in which students will explore the nature of design, creativity, and problem solving. The course will introduce some of the major theories from the design disciplines of interiors, architecture, landscape architecture, and products design, and provide students with an awareness, understanding, and enthusiasm for design and its impact on our lives.
3
IND2305Sketching the City

This course will provide an introduction to achromatic and poly-chromatic media used in observational sketching with an emphasis on quick sketch techniques and graphic expression of shape and form in the built environment.
3
ITA1120Elementary Italian I

This introductory course gives the student basic grammatical structures to enable speaking, understanding, reading, and writing at the elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1121 and/or 2220.
4
ITA1121Elementary Italian II

This course builds upon the students ability to speak, understand, read, and write Italian at an elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1120 and/or 2220.
4
ITA2220Reading & Conversation

This course stresses skills in reading and conversational Italian at the second-year level. Readings are supported by discussions of the materials. This course completes the baccalaureate degree requirement. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1120 and/or 1121. May not be taken by native speakers.
4
ITA2240Conversation

This course stresses development of conversational skills at the third-year level. May not be taken by native speakers.
3
ITA3420Grammar and Composition*

This course presents a review and further study of grammar and idiomatic constructions. Composition practice augments the skills developed.
3
ITT3523Italian Cinema

This course offers and introduction to Italian cinema: history, practices, and protagonists. Taught in English.
3
MAN3600Multinational Business Operations

This course provides an overview of the environments, markets, institutions, challenges, strategies, and operations of international and cross-cultural business; the globalization of business and associated challenges posed for the competitiveness of the modern enterprise; and the orientations, strategies, and tactics appropriate for international business success.
3
MAR3023Basic Marketing Concepts

This course is a required prerequisite for all marketing courses. Gives the student an understanding of the decision areas and the ability to utilize marketing concepts to make business decisions.
3
MUH2051Music in World Cultures

This course provides an introductory survey of various musical traditions in a global perspective, exploring music both as a phenomenon of sound and as a phenomenon of culture. Students analyze tradition as a constantly evolving and transformative entity that nurtures and sustains core cultural values. The social context of music, including social structure, geography, globalization, mass mediation, concepts of religion, instruments, aesthetic priorities, and cultural beliefs that inform music within given cultural contexts is emphasized.
3
MUL2010Music Literature, Listening and Understanding

This course is an introduction to music as a manifestation of human culture, as an expressive art form, and as an intellectual discipline. The course also develops a knowledge of a variety of significant musical repertoire, skills for perceptive listening, and the ability to respond to musical expression with critical insight.
3
PGY2100cPhotography for Non-Art Majors

This course is an introduction to camera operation and image making, with discussion of contemporary and historical work. Emphasis on 35mm slide projects rather than printing techniques. (This course may be offered as part of FSU International Programs curriculum.)
3
SYD3800Sociology of Sex and Gender

This course examines how gender, as an identity, interaction, institution, and inequality, influences individuals' lives and organizes society.
3
Session FL02Summer 2022
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
ARH2000Art, Architecture, and Artistic Vision

This course focuses on a thematic approach to the understanding and appreciation of works of art.
3
ARH4933Florentine Renaissance

The course is set against the historical background of Florence and looks at art and architecture in the context of patronage; that of the church, the guilds, the merchants and the Medici, the ruling family of the city. The Renaissance produced outstanding artists such as Donatello, Botticelli, Verrocchio, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo and Raphael; but these artists could not have existed without their patrons. It is this inter-connection which is our theme. The course will examine the emergence of Renaissance Florence via site visits to churches, palaces, museums and classroom sessions. The story is an unprecedented and excititng one: one small city produced a staggering array of artistic talent in a short period of time. Classical antiquity was the model, not only in artistic terms but in philosophical and political ones as well: Florence saw the rebirth of classical antiquity. The impact of that rebirth, that renaissance, still affects us today: our ways of thought, our ways of seeing are conditioned by that momentous period which changed the past forever, and ushered in the first modern era.
3
ART1300CDrawing I

This course includes creative expression and communication using a variety of black and white media.
3
ART3930Special Topics: Renaissance Murals/TBD (S/U only)

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
BUL3310The Legal and Ethical Environment of Business

This course offers an introduction to the legal setting in which business operates. Emphasis is on public and regulatory law and on the social, political, and ethical aspects of legal issues in business. Subjects include the nature of law and legal process, administrative law, business and the Constitution, statutory and common law, and related topics.
3
CGS2518Spreadsheets for Business Environments

This course provides an in-depth study of spreadsheets utilizing a problem-solving approach. Spreadsheet-based solutions are explored for common business tasks and problems. The course presents a thorough coverage of spreadsheet functions and tools, along with a deep understanding of their purpose in a business environment. The course is ideal for students with professional interests related to business and economics, as well as for students wishing to obtain a deeper understanding of spreadsheets in general.
3
ENT3607Innovation By Design

This course teaches methods common to human-centered innovation frameworks such as Design Thinking: empathizing, framing and reframing problems, ideating, prototyping and testing solutions. Students learn the process of developing products, services, systems and other solutions from the initial discovery of needs, to presenting a tested solution ready for deployment.
3
ENT4934Special Topics: International Entrepreneurship

The ability to answer life’s challenges with an incomparable mix of practicality and beauty seems to be a trademark of Italian culture. From Roman times to the contemporary period, Italian creativity has influenced the world in the most various fields of knowledge and practice, both in the sciences and humanities. We can think of Roman law and buildings; Dante’s Divine Comedy; Leonardo da Vinci’s genius; Michelangelo’s art; Machiavelli’s ideas; Monteverdi’s creation of Opera; Fellini’s masterpieces; Italian cars, cuisine, fashion, and even the recent Maneskin musical phenomenon! Each philosophy, discovery, invention and product is, however, rife with ethical issues and questions due to the complex nature of the human relationships involved in its creation and fruition.Through the Made in Italy concept, this course has the twofold objective of introducing students to Italian culture and to ethical thinking. Using a variety of case studies, we will explore ethical concerns and positions specific to our era of globalization. Should we, for example, celebrate Columbus’ Day? How do we reconcile our fashion addiction with concerns about skilled labor’s exploitation? What ethical issues are hiding behind the Made in Italy label?
3
FOL3930Experiments in Modern Languages - Gender in Italian Culture

This class will explore Italian culture, narrative and cinema through the lens of gender. What is gender? What does it mean to study culture through gender? Starting from a very famous and controversial novel, Sibilla Aleramo's A Woman, we will explore how female, male, and non-binary identities are built in the Italophone space. We will discuss Pasolini's visual investigation of Italian sexual customs, Elena Ferrante's essential renegotiation of gender tropes in contemporary Italy, but also the importance of social media in fostering new conversations on gender violence. Through journals and "interviews of the other," we will use the class space, but also the students' own lived experience in Florence, to discuss each student's relationship with and awareness of masculinity, femininity, gender roles and gendered knowledge.  
3
HFT2890International Food and Culture

The course is designed to explore the world’s cuisines with a focus on the history of culinary arts, indigenous ingredients, customs, protocol, celebrations, religions, and various cooking methods and terminology.
3
HFT2890International Food and Culture*

The course is designed to explore the world’s cuisines with a focus on the history of culinary arts, indigenous ingredients, customs, protocol, celebrations, religions, and various cooking methods and terminology.
3
HFT4866Wine and Culture*

This course is an introduction to basic wine knowledge that, together with wine tasting, enhances student understanding and appreciation of wine and its place in our culture and heritage. Restricted to students 21 years of age and older. May not be taken as an S/U course.
3
HUM4931Topics in Civilization of Italy: Modern Italian Culture**

This course is an introduction to the cultural developments and sociopolitical changes in modern Italy from the Risorgimento to the formation of a nation. Students examine Fascism's influence on the national culture, as well as consider the contemporary impact of immigration on diversity. Offered in English.
3
ISM3541Introduction to Business Analytics

This course provides students with an introduction to basic business analytics concepts and applications. The course covers the principles of data analytic thinking and provide a solid foundation for data driven decision making in various business and organizational settings. The course places special emphasis on working through applications and examples of analytics in the real world.
3
ITA1120Elementary Italian I

This introductory course gives the student basic grammatical structures to enable speaking, understanding, reading, and writing at the elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1121 and/or 2220.
4
ITA1121Elementary Italian II

This course builds upon the students ability to speak, understand, read, and write Italian at an elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1120 and/or 2220.
4
ITA2240Conversation

This course stresses development of conversational skills at the third-year level. May not be taken by native speakers.
3
ITA3420Grammar and Composition

This course presents a review and further study of grammar and idiomatic constructions. Composition practice augments the skills developed.
3
ITT3500Italian Culture and Civilization: From Origins to the Age of Romanticism

This course is an introduction to artistic, intellectual, social, and political trends in Italy from pre-Roman times to the Age of Romanticism with specific reference to Medieval and Renaissance Italy as a center of culture in Europe. Offered in English.
3
ITT3501Modern Italian Culture**

This course is an introduction to the cultural developments and sociopolitical changes in modern Italy from the Risorgimento to the formation of a nation. Students examine Fascism's influence on the national culture, as well as consider the contemporary impact of immigration on diversity. Offered in English.
3
ITT3523Italian Cinema

This course offers and introduction to Italian cinema: history, practices, and protagonists. Taught in English.
3
LDR2101Leadership Theory and Practice

This course is designed to inspire, teach, and engage students in the process of learning leadership. The course introduces students to leadership theory and helps them understand their unique role in leadership on campus, in their academic discipline, and within our larger society.
3
LDR3215Leadership and Change

This advanced undergraduate leadership course examines the change process and prepares leaders who are effective in working with individuals, groups, and organizations in leading and managing change. This is an interactive theory-to-practice course, focused on leadership as a change process.
3
MAN3240Organizational Behavior

This course covers behavioral concepts, techniques, and applications for managing human resources in all types of organizations.
3
MAR3023Basic Marketing Concepts

This course is a required prerequisite for all marketing courses. Gives the student an understanding of the decision areas and the ability to utilize marketing concepts to make business decisions.
3
REE3043Real Estate

This course is a survey introduction to real estate, real estate evaluation, and real estate investment decision making. The course, in addition to REE 4433, meets the FREC educational requirement for real estate sales licensing.
3
Session LY12: Summer 2022
Students must choose one class from LN01, one class from LN02, and one class from LN03
Session LN01Summer 2022
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
ARH2000Art, Architecture, and Artistic Vision

This course focuses on a thematic approach to the understanding and appreciation of works of art.
3
COM3421Queer Studies

In Queer Studies, students will read selective texts in order to familiarize themselves with foundational concepts from queer theory and queer history. In addition, students will visit queer-themed exhibits, attend a queer-themed play or film, meet queer artists and activists, and explore LGBTQ+ landmarks such as Highbury Fields, the site of the first gay rights protest in the UK. At the end of the four-week term, students in pairs, will give an informative speech at the site of “LGBTQ+ Landmark” (e.g. Virginia Woolf’s childhood homes, a statue of Oscar Wilde) or jointly deliver a persuasive speech as to what is a “must see/ must do” before we leave London (e.g. visit “Gays the Word Bookshop” in Bloomington.)
3
DAN2100Dance Appreciation

For our London Dance Appreciation course, we will delve into the ways that media, such as movies and tv shows (Bridgerton, for example) has "choreographed" London, then we'll sojourn into the city to explore how dance in popular culture shapes our understanding of London's history, culture, the city itself, and the people within it (including ourselves). This course is a survey of the development of dance in human culture with emphasis on dance as an art form. The major periods of dance history, choreographic masterworks, and artists in choreography and performance are explored through readings, discussion, media presentation, live performances, and movement laboratories. No prior dance experience is required.
3
ENC4218Visual Rhetoric: Space, Place, and Justice

This incarnation of ENC 4218 will address the nature of the visual within the context of spatial rhetorics and social justice. Students will read some foundational principles in the "spatial," the "rhetorical," and the "memorial," then extend those foundational principles by analyzing various texts and sites that occur throughout the city. Students are especially encouraged to consider the challenges of applying such analytic frameworks to living texts such as monuments, memorials, archives, and multicultural performances. Ultimately, students will be encouraged to consider visual rhetoric as performances of textual and communicative ideals related to social justice, and not merely visual images of places and things.
3
HFT2061Ales, Lagers, and International Culture*

This course is an introduction to ales and lagers of the world with a focus upon their importance to global cultures found in many regions. Students learn about these regional beers and the interrelation with their culture, including food, heritage, and festivals.
3
HFT4064Ales, Lagers, and Culture*

This course is an introduction to ales and lagers of the world with a focus upon their importance to global cultures found in many regions. Students learn about these regional beers and the interrelationship with their culture, including food, heritage, and festivals. Restricted to students twenty-one years of age and older.
3
LDR3215Leadership and Change

This advanced undergraduate leadership course examines the change process and prepares leaders who are effective in working with individuals, groups, and organizations in leading and managing change. This is an interactive theory-to-practice course, focused on leadership as a change process.
3
NSP3685Grief, Loss and Trauma: Ethnic and Individual Variations

This course explores similarities and differences among cultures when responding to grief and loss. Topics related to diverse populations and grief practices are examined, as well as personal response to grief, loss, and trauma; not exclusively utilizing death as the only example of loss or trauma. The course allows students to expand their reactions to life and death, plan their own funeral, and at the same time focus on family, community, and worldwide populations.
3
PSY4930Special Topics in Psychology: Individual Difference Dimensions Across Cultures in the Psychology of Art

This course will focus on individual difference dimensions in psychology that are associated with the experience and production of art (broadly construed). Individual difference constructs will be explored from a cross-cultural perspective and will include personality (openness to experience, extraversion, etc.), psychopathology (depression, schizophrenia, substance abuse, etc.), emotion, and religiosity. Students will be engaged to think critically about these psychological constructs and how they may influence the preference for certain styles of art, architecture, and literature and how they may contribute to the creation of art in various forms. The course was designed to be taught in London with excursions planned to the National Gallery in Trafalgar Square as well as the Tate Modern museum. A visit is also planned for either St. Paul’s Cathedral or Westminster Abbey when we cover religiosity.
3
THE2000Introduction to Theatre

This course focuses on the historical development and basic elements for appreciation and evaluation of theatrical performances. The course is designed for non-majors.
3
Session LN02Summer 2022
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
CTE4937Special Topics in Retail: London Inspiration for U.S. Retail Businesses

This course will focus on comparing and contrasting retail businesses in the London and the U.S. Markets focusing on the influences London’s retail has had on American business. Students will be studying areas of the retail industry that include management, operations, merchandising or buying using different types of retail businesses such as department stores, grocery stores, and specialty stores. This course gives students in all majors an opportunity to understand the retail trade in an ever-changing industry with a choice of many different types of careers. London has long been known for its iconic department stores as well as their influence in the fashion industry. Students will be able to experience retailers such as: The Shop at Bluebird, Harrods, Dover Street Market and Camden Market (just to name a few). We will also look at any lasting effects the COVID epidemic has had on the industry.
3
ENG4020Rhetorical Theory & Practice

This course offers an overview of rhetorical theory, with special emphasis on issues crucial to 21st – century communication, media, and literacy. Such issues include: individual agency, the role of community, popular culture and technology. Ultimately, students will explore issues surrounding various social identities, examine epistemologies that attempt to explain the role these identities play in understanding culture in international settings, and critically analyze social justice policies and practice to greater understand the influence of culture and identity. This course examines rhetorical theories manifested through social justice within four main ways of knowing: (a) people, (b) paradigms, (c) practices, and (d) policies. The complexity and dynamics of knowledge (and our world more broadly) speak to the need for activists and policy makers who are knowledgeable of and responsive to cultural issues in all aspects of social justice and international work. The course is designed for upper-division students who indend to teach English Composition.
3
ENT4625Music Entrepreneurship and Venture Incubation

The objective of this course is to build a foundation in music industry entrepreneurship. Students will survey stories of musical entrepreneurs beginning with the creation of Jazz in the 1890’s to TikTok in 2020, with exclusive guest interviews of highly successful music entrepreneurs in London and the US. Students will also create a real-life or hypothetical music business venture experiencing the start-up process from problem identification, creating solutions and going to market. Students will present deliverables including lean-startup business plans, branding, design, market research and simulations of their new venture at the end of the course. This London edition of the course will focus on the needs of diverse musicians in the UK and Europe, the issues music professionals face and, as music-entrepreneurs-in-training, students will create solutions with their venture projects to improve the lives of people working within music and their audiences. Students will have the opportunity to directly interview and collaborate with professionals, students and instructors of a renowned music academies in London to learn about their real world experiences as music professionals in the UK.
3
HUM2742Walking in London

This course explores mobility in the big city through the eyes and ears of the flâneur who saunters aimlessly and leisurely as he or she observes scenes in the big city. We will investigate the political, aesthetic, sociological, and historical meaning of walking in London by reading influential works from a range of disciplines—as well as by doing it. The course will combine theory with practice: students will learn how the term flâneur or “man about town” became shorthand for modernist notions of leisure, spectacle, and elite urban experience across a range of disciplines, from literary studies and art history to urban studies and media theory. Using tools of keen observation, critical awareness, and discussion to think about how, where, and why we walk, students will develop a keener sense of the changing meanings of mobility; of the treatment of national identity, gender, class, and race in relation to urban mobility and sense of place; and of sensory interactions with the social or built environment.
3
IDH2402Youth Subcultures - Honors Section*

From mods and rockers to punks and goths, London has long been a global center for youth subculture. This program has students explore the history of subcultures in the UK, while also providing opportunities to document youth subcultures found in London today. Emphasizing interdisciplinary inquiry, we will explore how different modes of expression – music, fashion, visual art, textual production, and more – come together to define particular subcultural styles, belief systems, identities, and communities. Excursions to museums, tours of King’s Road, and conversations with locals will give students a first-hand view into how subcultures both contest and reinforce dominant ideas about class, race, gender, sexuality, and nation. This class covers the Diversity-Y, Social Sciences, and Scholarship in Practice Liberal Studies designations and encourages students’ hands-on, creative engagement with London’s subcultural social worlds. This section of IDH 2402 is only open to students who are enrolled in the FSU Honors Program.
3
IDH2402Youth Subcultures*

From mods and rockers to punks and goths, London has long been a global center for youth subculture. This program has students explore the history of subcultures in the UK, while also providing opportunities to document youth subcultures found in London today. Emphasizing interdisciplinary inquiry, we will explore how different modes of expression – music, fashion, visual art, textual production, and more – come together to define particular subcultural styles, belief systems, identities, and communities. Excursions to museums, tours of King’s Road, and conversations with locals will give students a first-hand view into how subcultures both contest and reinforce dominant ideas about class, race, gender, sexuality, and nation. Both Honors and non-Honors students can register for this course, which covers the Diversity-Y, Social Sciences, and Scholarship in Practice Liberal Studies designations and encourages students’ hands-on, creative engagement with London’s subcultural social worlds.
3
IND2219Design and the Human Experience

Course is approved for Liberal Studies and meets the Humanities and Cultural Practice FSU requirement. This course focuses on the impact of design on the human experience. It is a gateway experience in which students will explore the nature of design, creativity, and problem solving. The course will introduce some of the major theories from the design disciplines of interiors, architecture, landscape architecture, and products design, and provide students with an awareness, understanding, and enthusiasm for design and its impact on our lives.
3
LDR2213Leadership for Social Justice

This course introduces students to theoretical frameworks in the field of social justice. Through these theories, the notions of privilege, oppression, power and difference are explored. Attention is given to specific social justice issues related to gender, sexual orientation, race, religion, ability, age, and class. Students examine social justice in the context of leadership and come to understand their unique role in creating social change on campus, in their academic discipline, and within our larger society.
3
SPC2608Public Speaking

This course covers the principles of and the practical experience of public speaking. The course is required of all majors. The course is also available in hybrid format (mostly online, partly classroom).
3
SYD3020Population and Society

This course examines the causes and consequences of population change in the United States and the world with an assessment of the impact of demographic change on various social institutions.
3
THE3061Introduction to Theatre in London

This introductory course is designed to acquaint students with the components of the theatrical experience as they relate specifically to current dramaturgy and stagecraft in London. It is to be offered only at The Florida State University London Study Center. It should be viewed as a companion class to THE 2000 Introduction to Theatre, for majors and nonmajors, but may be taken independently. It makes use of the theatrical resources in the city of London, including attendance at leading theatres, backstage tours, and lectures by prominent theatre artists.
3
Session LN03Summer 2022
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
ACG2021Introduction to Financial Accounting

This course offers an introduction to financial accounting concepts, placing emphasis on financial statements and how they reflect business transactions. Please note, Accounting Majors must earn at least a "B" in this course to proceed to required 3000 level accounting courses.
3
ART2003CContemporary Art Scholarship & Practice

This course introduces the theories and creative processes that propel contemporary art and design. Students will study a wide range of media and methods used by visual artists and designers to create meaning in their images, objects, and experiences. The class format includes lectures, site visits, required readings, discussions, critical writing, and a culminating project. London is a contemporary art mecca where students will visit world class museums, galleries, artist studios, and workshops. The city and its art centers will be our laboratory where students will build connections between art and pressing issues of our time. Through the lens of today’s artists students will gain an understanding of contemporary art and apply their primary experiences to their own life and creative practice.
3
COM3930Special Topics in Communication: Star Wars: Myth, History, and Future

This course examines the Star Wars saga from a historical and cultural perspective. We will explore the history, impact, and continuing legacy of Star Wars as a popular culture text that leverages variations of global cultural story-telling to explore our own pasts. The course will engage with the rich history of London (with the surrounding areas being key locations for the production of the films) as a lens through which we can think about how Star Wars theorizes and shapes our future. We will pay special attention to the franchise’s depiction of marginalized communities and the inspiration it has taken from real-world geopolitics.
3
ENG3931Topics in English: Black British Media and Culture

This course is an interactive engagement with Black British media and culture. We will consider how it has impacted and transformed mainstream British culture from the Windrush generation to our contemporary moment by taking advantage of London as our classroom. We will go on a walking tour of Black London; visit the Black Cultural Archives and markets in Brixton; and attend concerts and festivals after learning the histories of Black music in England from renowned guest lecturers and artists. Not only will we read canonical Black British texts such as Samuel Selvon’s The Lonely Londoners and Zadie’s Smith’s White Teeth, but also, we will watch Michaela Cole’s television shows and learn to cook the Afro-Caribbean dishes reshaping British cuisine. Through fiction, poetry, museum spaces, street life, food, fashion, and music, students will engage the full landscape of London through the lens of the African Diaspora.
3
ENT3607Innovation by Design

This course teaches methods common to human-centered innovation frameworks such as Design Thinking: empathizing, framing and reframing problems, ideating, prototyping and testing solutions. Students learn the process of developing products, services, systems and other solutions from the initial discovery of needs, to presenting a tested solution ready for deployment.
3
INR3932Special Topics in International Affairs: British Culture in a Changing World Landscape

This course takes you out of the classroom and into the streets of London to study the vibrant history, politics and social changes that have helped shape the culture of today’s Britain. As a class, we will explore the hidden rules and rituals of British behavior from a participant observer perspective. The course will also introduce students to the concept and practice of building cultural competence. Course work will be based on firsthand experience, discussion and reflection, as we visit various sites around the city. Guest speakers will also be featured.
3
MAN4301Human Resource Management: Managing People in a Global Environment

This course is a survey of the human resource management function in organizations. Topics include: selection, recruiting, training, compensation, and performance appraisal.
3
MAR4939Marketing Seminar: The Business of Beauty in the UK

This course will provide insight into the ~$15b UK beauty market. London is a market of influence-and as such the city will be a classroom to present the students with an understanding of beauty brands and the retail environment in the UK. The beauty industry has highly engaged consumers across generational and demographic segments, categories, price points and distribution channels. Through store visits to such landmarks as Harrods, Selfridges and Harvey Nichols, as well meetings with key brands such as Jo Malone, Tom Ford, and Anastasia, the class will use discussion, lecture and projects, to develop an understanding of brands, consumers, and distribution in the UK. There will also be some time given to contrasting the UK and U.S. markets through experiential opportunities.
3
REL3340The Buddhist Tradition

This course surveys the Buddhist tradition from its beginnings through the modern period. Some attention to its contemporary forms.
3
SOW3933Seminar in Global Social Work Ethics

This course seeks to provide students with the tools to recognize and analyze ethical dilemmas, associated with the immigration of unaccompanied asylum-seeking minors in the United Kingdom. Its emphasis is on human rights and other social justice factors that arise from and driven by social, political, and cultural forces. The course provides students with an international lens to analyze the governmental and private sector roles in social problem definition and response. Students will have the opportunity to identify and analyze ethical dilemmas with consideration for the role that competing demands can have on social justice for and social welfare service delivery with unaccompanied asylum-seeking minors. Students will further consider ways in which ethical principles and practice definitions vary depending on the auspice or body from which they arise.
3

*/**/***/****/^ Courses followed by these symbols denote cross listing. Students may take one or the other, but not both.

Money Matters

Program Fees

The FYA program fee is comprehensive and includes up to 49 credit hours over the program’s 3 semesters; housing for the program’s duration; international health insurance; cultural excursions and activities; full-time administrative and academic support; some meals or vouchers (as described for each location); and visas (Florence, Panama, and Valencia). Students who take fewer than 49 credit hours are not entitled to a refund of any fees. The program structure, dates, and fees are dependent upon immigration laws of the host country and are subject to change.

Payments

The FYA program fee is divided into seven payments: an initial non-refundable $2,500 commitment fee confirms students’ participation in the FYA program, and two payments are due prior to the beginning of the fall, spring, and summer semesters. The FYA Payment schedule with due dates is available under the garnet Dates & Docs tab above.

Financial Aid

Almost all sources of Financial aid (Florida Prepaid, Bright Futures, Loans, Grants, VA funding, Scholarships) are applicable toward program fees. Read Understanding the Financial Aid Process for Students Studying Abroad and click the boxes below to learn more about each type of aid.

If you have any questions about Finances, contact the IP Financial Aid Coordinator at IP-financialAid@fsu.edu.

Florida Bright Futures

Florida Bright Futures scholarship funds may be used toward a semester abroad. The Bright Futures Academic Scholarship and Medallion Scholarships will be available for all terms.

The Florida Department of Education website contains additional information concerning eligibility, renewal criteria, appeal processes and legislative updates.

Credit Hours Bright Futures Academic
$213.55 Per Credit Hour
Bright Futures Medallion
$160.16 Per Credit Hour
6 $1281.30 $960.96
7 $1494.85 $1121.12
8 $1708.40 $1281.28
9 $1921.95 $1441.44
10 $2135.50 $1601.60
11 $2349.05 $1761.76
12 $2562.60 $1921.92
13 $2776.15 $2082.08
14 $2989.70 $2242.24
15 $3203.25 $2402.40
16 $3416.80 $2562.56
17 $3630.35 $2722.72
18 $3843.90 $2882.88

Quick Links

Florida Prepaid

Florida Prepaid (FPP) tuition and local fees and/or dorm benefits may be used to pay International Programs fees.

To use a Florida Prepaid dorm account during the summer term, the purchaser of the Prepaid account must contact Florida Prepaid and complete the steps required to authorize use of the summer dorm plan for studying abroad. All other plans will be billed by FSU without additional authorization.

Contact Florida Prepaid directly at 1-800-552-4723 or access their requirements online at https://www.myfloridaprepaid.com/resources/forms/.

Note: Eligibility for summer financial aid requires enrollment in at least six credits.

How much is my Florida Prepaid worth if I study abroad?

# of Credits Enrolled FPP Tuition FPP Local Fees* Dorm Rate
1 $115.08 $34.73 $3890.00
2 $230.16 $69.46 Per Term**
3 $345.24 $104.19
4 $460.32 $138.92
5 $575.40 $173.65
6 $690.48 $208.38
7 $805.56 $243.11
8 $920.64 $277.84
9 $1035.72 $312.57
10 $1150.80 $347.30
11 $1265.88 $382.03
12 $1380.96 $416.76
13 $1496.04 $451.49
14 $1611.12 $486.22
15 $1726.20 $520.95
  • * Please note the above tuition and fees are subject to change at any time.
  • ** Contact FPP for authorization instructions to use dorm account during a summer term: 850-309-1660 ext. 4134

Quick Links

International Programs Scholarship Opportunities

International Programs strives to award an average of $200,000 in scholarships annually to about 100 students.

Current FSU students who have been admitted to an international program can apply to IP scholarships through the FS4U portal (link below). Before applying, students should review the list of available scholarship opportunities as well as the application process instructions.

Please note: IP scholarships are not available to in-state/out-of-state students currently on the First Year Abroad (FYA) program or First Semester Abroad (FSA) program or those who are directly enrolled at FSU Panama. Some scholarships may have additional eligibility criteria in addition to what is listed below. Please reference the Scholarship Application Instructions for complete details.

Scholarship Application Deadlines

Program Start Date Scholarship Open Date Scholarship Application Deadline Scholarship Award Decisions Communicated to Applicants
Spring 2022 June 9, 2021 September 8, 2021 Prior to September 22, 2021
Summer 2022 November 1, 2021 January 5, 2022 Prior to January 19, 2022
Fall 2022 January 14, 2022 April 27, 2022 Prior to May 18, 2022

Scholarships Administered by Other FSU Departments

Other departments at FSU also offer their own study abroad scholarship opportunities. You can review the list of scholarships administered by other FSU departments by following the link below.

As a member of the Generation Study Abroad campaign sponsored by the Institute for International Education, Florida State University is committed to the goal of doubling the number of our study abroad participants by 2020. As part of this commitment, International Programs awards an average of $200,000 in scholarships annually to about 100 students.

Current FSU students who have been admitted to an International Program can apply to IP scholarships through the FS4U portal (link below). Before applying, you should review the list of available scholarship opportunities as well as the application process instructions.

Please note: IP scholarships are not available to in-state/out-of-state students currently on the First Year Abroad (FYA) program or First Semester Abroad (FSA) program or those who are directly enrolled at FSU-Panama. Some scholarships may have additional eligibility criteria in addition to what is listed below. Please reference the Scholarship Application Instructions for complete details.

Scholarship Application Deadlines

Program Start Date Scholarship Open Date Scholarship Application Deadline Scholarship Award Decisions Communicated to Applicants
Spring Break 2020 September 4, 2019 October 23, 2019 Prior to November 6, 2019

Scholarships Administered by Other FSU Departments

Other departments at FSU also offer their own study abroad scholarship opportunities. You can review the list of scholarships administered by other FSU departments by following the link below.

Other Scholarship Opportunities

Follow the link below for a general listing of  scholarships that may be available for international study. These scholarships are available to both FSU students and non-FSU students.

Related Materials

External Links

Study Abroad Loans

Additional Discount or Savings Opportunities

Multi-Term Discount

Students who have completed 15 or more credit hours on programs administered by the International Programs office, earning at least a 3.0 average or above in their course work at an international location(s), are eligible for a discount for subsequent IP program. The discount is $500 for summer session or $1,000 for fall or spring semester. Note: This discount is built into the program fees for First Year Abroad program students.

Florida-Costa Rica Linkage Institute

The Florida-Costa Rica Linkage Institute, known as FLORICA, was created in 1986, authorized by the Florida Legislature in 1987, and formalized by an agreement signed by the State University System of Florida, the Florida Community College System and the Council of Rectors of Costa Rican Universities (CONARE). Since its beginning, FLORICA has been administered for Costa Rica by CONARE and on behalf of the State of Florida by The Florida State University and Valencia College, with co-directors appointed from each institution.

FLORICA has strong credibility both in Florida and Costa Rica as a stimulus and a catalyst. The Institute has interfaced broadly in Costa Rica with public and private institutions and agencies including all the public universities.

Costa Rican citizens who have applied and been accepted in a Florida public university or community college may apply for out-of-state tuition waivers through the Florida-Costa Rica Institute Non-Resident Tuition Exemption Program.

Co-Directors

Lacey Moret
FSU Center for Global Engagement
Attn: Florida Costa Rica Linkage
Florida State University
110 S. Woodward Ave Suite 2100
Tallahassee, FL 32306
Phone: 850.644.1702
Email: Linkage-FLCR@fsu.edu

In Partnership with Valencia College
Ariel Ortiz
Florida-Costa Rica Linkage Institute
Phone: 407.299.5000
Email: aortiz167@valenciacollege.edu

Florida-France Linkage Institute

The Florida-France Linkage Institute was created by the Legislature of the State of Florida in 1989. Over the years, the scope of activities and outreach of the Institute have grown considerably; in Florida, in France, and in the départments of the French Caribbean. The Florida-France Linkage Institute is administered by The University of South Florida in partnership with Florida State University and Miami-Dade College. The educational mission of each of these institutions lends an unusual and unique diversity to the joint co-sponsorship of the Florida-France Linkage Institute. The Florida-France Linkage Institute is supported on behalf of France by the office of the French Consulate-General in Miami.

The Florida-France Linkage Institute utilizes the resources of the State University System and the Community College System. The Institute also serves as a clearinghouse for inter-institutional and community networking to bring projects and activities to college and university campuses.

Thus, the Florida-France Linkage Institute places a high priority on its mission to serve as a facilitator for international tourism, trade, economic development, and business for the Office of Tourism, Trade and Economic Development (OTTED).

For more information about tuition waivers for the Florida-France Linkage Institute and to apply, visit the Florida France Institute Information and Application webpage.

Co-Directors

University of South Florida
Dr. Alexxis Avalon
Florida-France Linkage Institute
USF World
4202 E. Fowler Ave., CGS 101
Tampa, FL 33620
Email: ffli@usf.edu
Phone: (813) 974-5313
Fax: (813) 974-8271

If you have any questions regarding the application process, please feel free to contact Dr. Avalon by phone or by the email listed above.

In Partnership with Florida State University
To be announced

In Partnership with Miami-Dade College
To be announced

FSU Fees

Technology Fee (Not Included in Program Fees)

Florida State assesses a technology fee which is NOT included in the International Programs fee. The technology fee rate for 2021-2022 is assessed at $5.25 per credit hour for all students, regardless of location of study.

After registration, the student must pay the applicable technology fee; this fee is paid directly to Florida State University Student Business Services. Failure to pay this fee will result in a late payment charge being assessed to the student by Florida State University Student Business Services. International Programs has no control over the fee or any associated late payment penalty.

Facilities & Equipment Fees (Not Included in Program Fees)

International Programs fees do NOT include Facilities and Equipment Fees, which are assessed each semester for some majors (Medicine, Motion Pictures Arts, Music, Nursing, Fine Arts, Dance, Digital Media Production, etc.) even though you are studying overseas. If you are in one of these colleges/majors, you will be assessed a fee. Details can be found on the Registration Guide, under 'Fees and Financial Information.'

Financial Aid Info Sessions

The world is within your reach! Talk with a member of IP's Finances Team to learn how your financial aid can help you have a study abroad experience of a lifetime!

Join us for a virtual information session, register below! Or request a meeting by contacting IP-FinancialAid@fsu.edu. Be sure to follow us on social media @fsuip for updates.

  1. Tuesday, September 21st | 1-2 PM
    Register Here: https://fsu.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJAqfuGqrT0tEtN-kjYMhgc6nELYVuC_ZNBS
  2. Wednesday, October 6th | 11am-12 PM
    Register Here: https://fsu.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMlceGorD4vGNebr7M2AP1KHsmd7QO-5Z0N
  3. Thursday, October 21st | 4-5 PM
    Register Here: https://fsu.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEsceypqDsuEtNg8C_i2AG1Q9sMZOtNu_JU
  4. Wednesday, November 10th | 3-4 PM
    Register Here: https://fsu.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIkdOqrrT4sEtCxHX18GAbflNaZdKz7ixZq

Deferment Forms

The online fee deferment is located in the International Programs Student Portal under the Money Matters area. Login here to access the portal.

First Year Abroad Fee Liability (Including Withdrawal & Refund Policy)

Application Fee

All study abroad applicants are required to submit a non-refundable, non-transferrable application fee in order to have their application reviewed by International Programs. Paying the application fee does not guarantee admission to a program. Application Fee amounts vary by program.

Commitment Fee

Once admitted to the First Year Abroad (FYA) program, a non-refundable commitment fee is required to confirm your participation in the program. The FYA commitment fee must be paid rather than deferred. Applicants are liable for the FYA commitment fee on the commitment fee payment due date. Students whose offer of admission to Florida State University is rescinded after the commitment fee is paid will not be eligible to participate but will remain fee liable for the commitment fee.

Commitment Fee Payment Deadline

Admitted applicants who have not paid the non-refundable FYA commitment fee in full by the published commitment fee payment deadline will be ineligible to participate in the program (i.e. International Programs will change the student's status to cancelled and the student will have no further fee liability). Applicants who apply to a program after the regular commitment fee payment deadline has passed must pay the entire commitment fee to be eligible for admittance to the FYA program.

Remaining Program Fees

All admitted applicants must pay or defer program fees in accordance with the dates and amounts published in the First Year Abroad Payment Schedule in order to avoid being canceled from the program.

  • First term (fall): Payment of the commitment fee demonstrates intent to participate in the program. Applicants who have paid or deferred the first fall payment but not submitted a written request to cancel from the program as of the close of business on the first fall payment due date become fully liable for the corresponding program fees paid or deferred. Applicants who have paid or deferred the final fall payment but not submitted a written request to cancel from the program as of the close of business on the final fall payment due date become fully liable for the corresponding program fees paid or deferred.
  • Subsequent terms (spring & summer): Program applicants who have demonstrated their commitment to the program by participation in the first term of the program but who have not provided written notice of their intent to withdraw from the program at least 60 days prior to the beginning of any subsequent term remain fully liable for all remaining program fees for the subsequent term.

Submitting Cancellations and Refund / Release From Fee Liability Requests

Submit all cancellations and requests for refunds or release from fee liability in writing via email to IP-Cancel@fsu.edu. Applicants should include their last name and program code in the subject line of the email. Alternatively, requests may be submitted in writing to International Programs at the following postal address:

Attention: Refund Committee
Office of FSU International Programs
A5500 University Center
282 Champions Way
P.O. Box 3062420
Tallahassee, FL 32306-2420

Refunds/Release of Liability of Program Fees

Refunds of program fees/release of liability for program fees will be granted for student cancellations prior to the start of the program under the following circumstances, upon providing appropriate documentation:

  • Involuntary call to active duty
  • Death of the student or a death in the immediate family (parent, legal guardian, spouse, child, or sibling)

Partial Refunds/Release of Liability of Program Fees

Partial refunds/partial release of fee liability for program fees may be granted in instances of student withdrawal prior to the start of the program under the following circumstances, upon providing appropriate documentation:

  • Illness of the student of such a duration or severity that it precludes overseas travel. The student will be required to submit all relevant medical records for review and evaluation by FSU’s University Health Services. University Health Services will advise International Programs’ refund committee of its recommendation. International Programs’ refund committee will notify the student of the decision.
  • Exceptional unforeseen circumstances beyond the control of the student, as approved by the International Programs refund committee.
  • Failure to meet or maintain admission requirements, including rescission of admission by the Florida State University Office of Admissions for failure to meet the conditions of one’s admission. Students whose admissions offer to Florida State University is rescinded after the commitment fee is paid remain fee liable for the entire commitment fee amount.

Refund and Release of Liability Policy Details

In evaluating requests, the refund committee considers the timeliness of the notification in relation to the event causing the need for withdrawal and timeliness in relation to the start of the program.

  • Refunds or release of liability cannot be granted in instances of withdrawal after a program has begun.
  • In no instance is a refund or release of fee liability request considered if it is after the end of the applicable program or semester, even if the cancellation or withdrawal occurred prior to the start of the program.
  • Applicants who apply and are accepted after published due dates remain liable for fees in accordance with the published dates.

Refunds/Release of Liability of Program Fees When IP Cancels a Program

Refunds of program fees/release of liability for program fees will be granted when International Programs cancels a program prior to the beginning of the applicable term.

If FSU International Programs cancels a Study Abroad Portion of a program after the start of the term due to causes beyond the control of FSU International Programs, including, but not limited to, acts of God; natural disasters; riots; war; epidemics; terrorist activities; government restrictions; failure of suppliers, subcontractors, or carriers; or travel warnings or prohibitions issued by the World Health Organization or any U.S. federal government agency, including the Centers for Disease Control and the U.S. Department of State, no refunds of any kind will be issued. However, FSU International Programs, in its sole discretion, may issue refunds for unused program costs such as housing.

Tuition Waiver Policy for Out-Of-State Students

Upon completion of three consecutive semesters abroad and a minimum of 36 FSU credit hours at their European or Panama IP study center with an FSU GPA of 3.0 or better and having met all financial obligations related to participation in the First Year Abroad program, out-of-state students will receive an FYA waiver reducing the out-of-state tuition rates to the in-state tuition rates for the remainder of their first undergraduate degree at FSU in Tallahassee. This arrangement is contingent upon the student remaining in good academic and judicial standing. Upon return, students must attend consecutive semesters without interruption (summer terms excluded), progressing toward their degree completion, and staying "on map." The FYA out-of-state tuition waiver is applied after the drop/add period has ended each term.

For last year's FYA fee liability policy, please click here.

Visa Information

England

A visa is required for US citizens participating on a study abroad programme longer than six months in the United Kingdom. Due to the nature of the application process, students will need to apply and pay the associated fees on their own.

  • Passport Validity: Participants must hold a passport valid for at least six months beyond their intended departure from the UK containing at least two empty visa pages. Keep in mind that the last three pages of your passport are not visa pages.
  • Visa Fee: The cost to obtain the necessary entry clearance is approximately £348. The UK has implemented a health surcharge for all students studying over six months; the current cost is £705. Altogether, depending on currency fluctuations, these fees can amount to around $1,500. Please keep in mind these fees are not included in your program fees.
  • Biometrics: One of the steps to receive the visa will be to make an appointment for your biometrics appointment. This is where you will be fingerprinted and photographed by an authorized UK Biometrics Facility. Although this cannot be completed before specifically instructed, please plan ahead by referring to the USCIS website to determine where the closest facility is to you.
  • Financial Support: United Kingdom Visas and Immigration require those applying for the year-long student visa to have financial support in the amount of $15,500. This must be in the form of original financial aid award letters, an original recent bank statement (checking/savings only), or a notarized letter from the bank for an account either in the student’s or parent(s)’/guardian(s)’ names. Due to the differential agreement, you will not need to submit proof of financial with your application. Although, if asked for such by the UKVI, you must supply it within a reasonable amount of time.
  • Arrival in the UK: Since you will obtain a vignette in your passport prior to leaving the US, you may use the eGates upon arrival to the UK.
  • Flight Restrictions: If you enter the United Kingdom via the Republic of Ireland, your entry clearance status will not be properly activated upon arrival. Therefore, you cannot arrive on a flight that has a connection through Ireland.
  • Non-US Citizens: It is the responsibility of the participant to check the following link to determine if a visa is needed to partake in a study abroad programme in the UK: https://www.gov.uk/check-uk-visa. If a visa is required, please email an Immigration Specialist at IP-Visas@fsu.edu and they will assist you to the best of their ability.

Italy

A visa is required for US citizens participating in a study abroad program longer than 90 days in Italy. A number of documents will need to be submitted in order for International Programs to apply for the visa on your behalf. Full visa information will be provided in a “Visa Packet”. Please take note of the following important visa requirements:

  • Passport Validity: Participants must hold a passport valid for at least six months beyond their intended departure from Italy containing at least two empty visa pages. Keep in mind that the last three pages of your passport are not visa pages.
  • Financial Support: The Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs require those applying for a year-long student visa to have proof of financial support in the amount of $12,000. This must be in the form of an original recent bank statement (checking/savings only) or a notarized letter from the bank for an account either in the student’s or parent(s)’/guardian(s)’ names.
  • Travel Restrictions: You will be required to submit your passport for visa processing. As such, international travel prior to your program will be restricted. If you have preexisting travel arrangements, please contact ip-visas@fsu.edu.
  • Under 18 Years Old: Minors will be required to submit additional visa documentation. Please contact ip-visas@fsu.edu if you will be under 18 as of June prior to your program.
  • Non-US Citizens: Non-US citizens will be required to submit documentation proving the ability to return to the US following their study abroad program. Further information will be provided in the Visa Packet.
  • E.U. Citizens: Please be advised that if you possess dual citizenship with a country in the European Union, you will likely be required to enter Italy on your European passport. Check the expiration date to ensure it is valid for the duration of your time abroad. If it is not, you should renew it immediately.

Republic of Panama

A Temporary Resident Permit is required for US citizens participating in a study abroad program in Panama. While the majority of the application process will occur in Panama, please take note of the following important requirements:

  • Passport Validity: Participants must hold a passport valid for at least six months beyond their intended departure from Panama containing at least two empty visa pages. Keep in mind that the last three pages of your passport are not visa pages.
  • Police Background Check: Please be advised that a criminal background check is required as part of the visa process. International Programs can obtain this on your behalf.
  • Under 18 Years of Age: Minors will be required to submit additional visa documentation to International Programs prior to departure. Please contact ip-visas@fsu.edu if you will be under 18 upon arrival in Panama.
  • Non-US Citizens: Depending on your country of citizenship, you may be subject to a different immigration process prior to departure. If you are a non-US citizen, please contact ip-visas@fsu.edu and we will assist you to the best of our ability.

Spain

A visa is required for US citizens participating in a study abroad program longer than 90 days in Spain.

  • Passport Validity: Participants must hold a passport valid for at least six months beyond their intended departure from Spain containing at least two empty visa pages. Keep in mind that the last three pages of your passport are not visa pages.
  • Financial Support: The Spanish Ministry of Foreign Affairs require those applying for a year-long student visa to have proof of financial support in the amount of $7,800. This must be in the form of original financial aid award letters, an original recent bank statement (checking/savings only), or a notarized letter from the bank for an account either in the student’s or parent(s)’/guardian(s)’ names.
  • FBI Background Check: The Spanish Ministry of Foreign Affairs requires all students applying for a visa with a duration greater than six months to obtain an FBI Background Check. Please do not start the background check process until prompted.
  • Travel Restrictions: You will be required to submit your passport for visa processing. As such, international travel prior to your program will be restricted. If you have preexisting travel arrangements, please contact ip-visas@fsu.edu.
  • Under 18 Years Old: Minors will be required to submit additional visa documentation. Please contact ip-visas@fsu.edu if you will be under 18 as of June prior to your program.
  • Non-US Citizens: Non-US citizens will be required to submit documentation proving the ability to return to the US following their study abroad program. Further information will be provided in the Visa Packet.
  • E.U. Citizens: Please be advised that if you possess dual citizenship with a country in the European Union, you will likely be required to enter Spain on your European passport. Check the expiration date to ensure it is valid for the duration of your time abroad. If it is not, you should renew it immediately.

Important Dates & Documents

Fall FYA 2021 - Important Dates
Applications Open*Thursday, February 18, 2021 $100.00
FYA Application DeadlineSaturday, May 01, 2021
Commitment Fee DueSaturday, May 01, 2021$2,500.00
First Payment for Fall DueWednesday, May 12, 2021
Fall Full Payment DueWednesday, June 09, 2021
IPre-Depart (Orientation) Meeting Online

*Early application is advisable as program enrollment is limited and acceptances are offered on a rolling basis.

***

Documents

Health & Safety

For 60 years, Florida State University International Programs has been committed to providing a rewarding academic and cultural experience that enriches the lives of our students. Our highest priority is and always has been the welfare and security of our students.

Program directors maintain contact with our Tallahassee office, local authorities, and United States officials, both at home and abroad. Each program holds meetings with students in which safety procedures and precautions are detailed and regularly re-emphasized. Each program has an Emergency Plan which includes details about local health care facilities, meeting points and procedures, and contingency plans and funds should it ever become necessary to evacuate our students.

Students are reminded to inform International Programs of the details of their independent travel details via our online travel form, heed US State Department travel advisories, and take relevant emergency and US Embassy/Consulate contact information with them.

Students venture abroad to experience other cultures, and to gain a deeper appreciation of their role as American citizens in the world. FSU International Programs is fully committed to helping students realize these aspirations in a safe and secure learning environment.

Insurance

International Programs Insurance

All International Programs fees include international medical and evacuation insurance coverage through Cultural Insurance Services International (CISI). A link to our policy is provided below. The coverage will be effective for participants from the day the program starts until the day the program ends. Please note: this policy is NOT intended to replace your domestic coverage. For more information, visit studentinsurance.fsu.edu.

Travel Insurance Information

FSU International Programs encourages program participants to consider purchasing travel insurance. Travel insurance comes in many forms and can protect you in case you need to change your travel plans due to unforeseen circumstances. The coverage ranges from help with lost baggage to delay in flight plans to trip cancellation.

Travel insurance that covers fees associated with changing your airfare plans is especially helpful for those attending programs that require entry or student visas. Immigration approval can take months with regulations changing often that can cause the need to delay or cancel flight plans. Often airfare arrangements are non-refundable or cannot be changed without fee penalties. Certain types of trip cancellation insurance will reimburse you the cost of your airfare or penalty fees. Travel Insurance must cover failure to obtain visa.

You may wish to begin researching travel insurance and trip cancellation policies by using the Travel Insurance Review website. Their Travel Insurance 101: The Complete Guide to Travel Insurance section is particularly helpful for those just beginning their research. They also have a section that allows you to compare different policies.

Travel insurance is also offered through CISI and Travel Insured International. Please note that this plan must be purchased within 21 days of paying your first fee. For example, if looking to insure the cost of the program, the plan must be purchased within 21 days of paying the commitment fee to International Programs. If wishing to insure only the cost of the flight, the plan must be purchased within 21 days of purchasing airfare.

Travel Resources

University Policies & Resources

Clery Act

In compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, the Florida State University study center safety guides include institutional policies concerning campus security, such as policies concerning alcohol and drug use, crime prevention, the reporting of crimes, sexual assault, and other matters. The report also contains statistics for the previous three years concerning reported crimes that occurred on campus, in certain off campus buildings or property owned or controlled by The Florida State University; and on public property within or immediately adjacent and accessible from the campus. A paper copy is available upon request to FSU International Programs at A5500 University Center, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-2420, or by contacting FSU International Programs at (850) 644-3272 or (800) 374-8581.

Copies are also available from the study center administrative offices, or you may download from the links below: